Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    I,     2.  4    |            available data, rates of premature mortality are higher among
 2    I,     2.  4    |          and other risk factors for premature mortality. The available
 3   II,     5.  2.  6|             cholesterol and risk of premature death from coronary heart
 4   II,     5.  2.  7|        Nissinn A (1998): Changes in premature deaths in Finland: successful
 5   II,     5.  5.Int|            estimated ill-health and premature mortality in Europe with
 6   II,     5.  5.  1|             competitiveness through premature loss of life. One study
 7   II,     5.  5.  3|       natural and unnatural causes (premature deaths). About 10 percent
 8   II,     5.  5.  3|    co-morbidity accounts for 60% of premature deaths not related to suicide.
 9   II,     5.  5.  3|             of lifetime lost due to premature mortality (years of life
10   II,     5.  5.  3|            estimates of the cost of premature death were found in the
11   II,     5.  5.  3|             the healthy population. Premature retirement depended on the
12   II,     5.  6.  3|           factors: low body weight, premature menopause, a family history
13   II,     5.  7.  7|        Burbury K, Wheeler D (2000): Premature cardiovascular disease in
14   II,     5. 13    | productivity due to absenteeism and premature death (indirect costs);
15   II,     5. 14.  3|            diseases and the risk of premature birth. Periodontal health
16   II,     7.  1    |          other causes of illness or premature death, injuries are widely
17   II,     7.  4    |         young adults. The burden of premature deaths is particularly high
18   II,     7.  4.  6|           other important causes of premature death and hospitalisation.
19   II,     7.  5    |             causes of ill health or premature death, injuries can be prevented
20   II,     8.  2.  1|           disability are related to premature delivery and low birth weight,
21   II,     8.  2.  1|         delivery and in the care of premature infants have helped to reduce
22   II,     8.  2.  2|           life, pain, suffering and premature death that can result from
23   II,     9        |         that 7.5% of ill-health and premature death is a consequence of
24   II,     9        |           have an increased risk of premature death and circulatory disease.~ ~
25   II,     9.  3.  1|             levels of morbidity and premature mortality in men, as compared
26   II,     9.  3.  1|          description and analysis~ ~Premature death is frequent in middle
27   II,     9.  3.  1|            65 years old. In the EU, premature mortality (or mortality
28   II,     9.  3.  1|           at birth.~ ~Table 9.3.1.1 Premature mortality by selected causes
29   II,     9.  3.  1|            estimated ill-health and premature mortality in Europe with
30   II,     9.  3.  1|         that 7.5% of ill-health and premature death is a consequence of
31   II,     9.  3.  1|           have an increased risk of premature death and circulatory disease.~ ~
32  III,    10.  1    |        estimated 23% of all deaths (premature mortality) was due to environmental
33  III,    10.  2.  1|          Osteoporosis~- Impotence~- Premature skin ageing~ ~Sources: ASPECT,
34  III,    10.  2.  1|          plays an important role in premature mortality or mortality before
35  III,    10.  2.  1|             to smoking attributable premature deaths, productivity losses,
36  III,    10.  2.  1|         prevent tens of millions of premature deaths by the middle of
37  III,    10.  2.  1|            4% of all ill-health and premature death in the European Union
38  III,    10.  2.  1|             all male ill-health and premature death and a smaller but
39  III,    10.  2.  1|           all female ill-health and premature death. The larger proportion
40  III,    10.  2.  1|       absenteeism, unemployment and premature mortality accounts for a
41  III,    10.  2.  1| productivity due to absenteeism and premature death (indirect costs);
42  III,    10.  3.  1|         lost in a population due to premature mortality or morbidity,
43  III,    10.  3.  1|        health effects of EMF, it is premature to discuss possible policy
44  III,    10.  4.  1|            hundreds of thousands of premature deaths in Europe every year.
45  III,    10.  5.  3|        long-term disability or even premature death. It can also end careers
46  III,    10.  5.  3|            of € 10.8 billion. Thus, premature CVD deaths were responsible
47  III,    10.  5.  3|       unemployment is associated to premature mortality (Martikainen &
48  III,    10.  6.  1|             have increased rates of premature death and poorer chances
49  III,    10.  6.  2|            available data, rates of premature mortality are higher among
50  III,    10.  6.  2|          and other risk factors for premature mortality. The available
51   IV,    11.  1.  6|             system. This is still a premature attempt at analyzing performance,
52   IV,    11.  2.  1|            rates, overall levels of premature deaths, and premature deaths
53   IV,    11.  2.  1|            of premature deaths, and premature deaths from asthma, heart
54   IV,    12.  2    |         prevent tens of millions of premature deaths by the middle of
55   IV,    13.  2.  1|         combine the years lost from premature mortality with the years
56   IV,    13.  2.  1|             half a year lost due to premature death. In this way, the
57   IV,    13.  2.  3|             an estimated 23% of all premature mortality were due to environmental
58  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|           predispositions~pregnancy~premature~pre-natal~preparedness~presbycusis~