Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    I,     2. 10.  2|           surface area than the same mass of material produced in
 2   II,     5.  2.Acr|       Myocardial Infarction~BMI~Body Mass Index~CABG~Coronary Artery
 3   II,     5.  2.  4|          pressure, cholesterol, body mass index) and the fact that
 4   II,     5.  2.  7|         Preventive potential of body mass reduction to lower cardiovascular
 5   II,     5.  3.  7|        screening)~ ~An organised (or mass) screening programme must
 6   II,     5.  3.  7|     screening should be discouraged. Mass screening programmes can
 7   II,     5.  3.  7|           more easily. For instance, mass screening for neuroblastoma
 8   II,     5.  4.  4|            for prevention, i.e. body mass index, increases with age.
 9   II,     5.  4.  4|             now overweight. The body mass index is measured by weight
10   II,     5.  5.  3|             7.~Coodin S (2001): Body mass index in persons with schizophrenia.
11   II,     5.  6.  3|          characterized by a low bone mass and a microarchitectural
12   II,     5.  6.  3|                 Osteopenia (low bone mass): a BMD value between 1
13   II,     5.  6.  3|       fracture are falling, low bone mass, i.e. osteoporosis, and
14   II,     5.  7.  5|            Foundation, 2002 79 /id}. Mass screening through the measurement
15   II,     5.  8.Acr|             one second~FFMI~Fat-Free Mass Index~GOLD~the Global Initiative
16   II,     5.  8.  3|           depletion (defined as body mass index (BMI) <21 kg/m2 and/
17   II,     5.  8.  3|             21 kg/m2 and/or fat-free mass index (FFMI) <15 (females)
18   II,     5.  9.  4|           adjuvant activity per unit mass than coarse PM. No significant
19   II,     5. 13    |             2005; WHO, 2000). A body mass index (BMI) above the optimum
20   II,     6.  3.  6|              waterborne infections~ ~Mass catering, intensified farming,
21   II,     9        |               2003), and higher body mass index (BMI) in early adulthood (
22   II,     9.  3.  1|          increase with age. Low bone mass at menopause can be due
23   II,     9.  3.  1|         prevent further loss of bone mass or fractures until the disease
24   II,     9.  3.  1|          have larger accrual of bone mass during puberty; as a consequence,
25   II,     9.  3.  1|           such as a decrease in lean mass and an increase in fat mass (
26   II,     9.  3.  1|          mass and an increase in fat mass (particularly the abdominal
27   II,     9.  3.  1|               2003), and higher body mass index (BMI) in early adulthood (
28   II,     9.  3.  1|             Mineral Density~BMI~Body Mass Index~CHD~Coronary Hearth
29   II,     9.  5.  3|               2003), and higher body mass index (BMI) in early adulthood (
30  III,    10.  2.  1|           evidence for the impact of mass media campaigns to reduce
31  III,    10.  2.  1|                  Acronyms~ ~BMI~Body Mass Index~CAP~Common Agricultural
32  III,    10.  2.  1|             2005; WHO, 2000). A body mass index (BMI) above the optimum
33  III,    10.  2.  1|               At the same time, bone mass decreases with age and this
34  III,    10.  2.  1|            and adolescence when bone mass is built up, determining
35  III,    10.  2.  1|             up, determining the bone mass density in later life. Depending
36  III,    10.  2.  1|              height, weight and body mass index based on questionnaire
37  III,    10.  2.  1|        questions about healthBody mass index of the population
38  III,    10.  2.  1|    Overweight and obesity (high body mass index). In Comparative quantification
39  III,    10.  2.  1|              Changes in booking body mass index over a decade: retrospective
40  III,    10.  2.  1|            Rickenbach M (2001): Body mass index: comparing mean values
41  III,    10.  2.  1|             children: trends in body mass index from 1970 to 2002.
42  III,    10.  2.  1|              Hercberg S (2002): Body mass index in 7-9-y-old French
43  III,    10.  2.  5|           include an increase of fat mass and a reduction of lean
44  III,    10.  2.  5|              and a reduction of lean mass and total water content
45  III,    10.  2.  5| schizophrenia with low maternal body mass index, small size at birth
46  III,    10.  3.  4|           and effects of over 12.800 mass disasters in the world from
47  III,    10.  3.  4|        income of rural families. The mass media reported on deaths
48  III,    10.  3.  4|             population movements and mass displacement.~ ~Further
49  III,    10.  4.  2|            Maximum Residue Limits~MS~Mass Spectrometry~OECD~Organisation
50  III,    10.  4.  2|        Transfer~TOFMS~Time of Flight mass spectroscopy~TSE~Transmissible
51  III,    10.  4.  2|              liquid chromatographyMass Spectrometry (LC-MS), currently
52  III,    10.  4.  2|       introduction of Time of Flight mass spectroscopy (TOFMS) will
53  III,    10.  4.  5|         addressed are those with big mass flows and hazardous waste
54   IV,    12.  2    |           evidence for the impact of mass media campaigns to reduce
55   IV,    12. 10    |        promoting full-time schools”, mass media campaigns and information
56   IV,    12. 10    |          antismoking messages in the mass media.~ ~ ~Alcohol consumption~
57   IV,    12. 10    |                Co-operation with the mass media on this topicinformation