Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    I,     2.  2    |           exposure to a variety of hazardous agents and made the prevention
 2   II,     9        |         consequence of harmful and hazardous alcohol consumption and
 3   II,     9.  3.  1|         consequence of harmful and hazardous alcohol consumption and
 4   II,     9.  3.  1|       White, A & Pettifer, M (eds) Hazardous Waist: tackling male weight
 5   II,     9.  5.  1|        fight in wars or to work in hazardous industries. Little regard
 6  III,    10.  1    |           chemical factors such as hazardous substances in the outdoor
 7  III,    10.  2.  1|      should not be withheld a less hazardous form of tobacco. An alternative
 8  III,    10.  2.  1|             STP) are addictive and hazardous to health, and that there
 9  III,    10.  2.  1|       includes the risk of harm or hazardous alcohol consumption, as
10  III,    10.  2.  1| Healthcare-based interventions for hazardous and harmful alcohol consumption
11  III,    10.  2.  1|      interventions for people with hazardous and harmful alcohol use
12  III,    10.  2.  1|            range of protective and hazardous factors. Thus, in relation
13  III,    10.  2.  1|          nutrients and potentially hazardous chemicals within the European
14  III,    10.  3.  2|       recycling. Information about hazardous properties and human and
15  III,    10.  3.  2|           industry but also due to hazardous substances used in downstream
16  III,    10.  3.  2|         and increased knowledge of hazardous properties have led to environmental
17  III,    10.  3.  2|        environment.~ ~Emissions of hazardous chemicals from industrial
18  III,    10.  3.  2|      Consent Procedure for Certain Hazardous Chemicals (UNEP and FAO,
19  III,    10.  3.  2|        Trans-boundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal (
20  III,    10.  3.  2|          classifying and labelling hazardous substances, with a target
21  III,    10.  3.  2|          or health protection from hazardous chemicals are often developed
22  III,    10.  3.  2|          principle, to ensure that hazardous chemicals, products and
23  III,    10.  3.  2|         Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal.
24  III,    10.  3.  2|      Consent Procedure for Certain Hazardous Chemicals. Available at: htt ~ ~
25  III,    10.  4.  2|           levels are important for hazardous agents (see also Section
26  III,    10.  4.  5|             Soil contaminated with hazardous substances can have serious
27  III,    10.  4.  5|       municipal solid, special and hazardous waste is generated in all
28  III,    10.  4.  5|     generation;~· the reduction of hazardous substances in material streams
29  III,    10.  4.  5|            with big mass flows and hazardous waste streams.~ ~Contaminated
30  III,    10.  4.  5|     statistics about generation of hazardous waste in European countries
31  III,    10.  4.  5|       relevant for this chapter is hazardous waste, EU waste legislation
32  III,    10.  4.  5|        than 250 millions tonnes of hazardous waste, 3%-4% of the total,
33  III,    10.  4.  5|            types are classified as hazardous. Therefore, the figures
34  III,    10.  4.  5|          Therefore, the figures on hazardous waste are not entirely comparable.~ ~
35  III,    10.  4.  5|   comparable.~ ~Figure 10.4.5.2.3. Hazardous waste generation in selected
36  III,    10.  4.  5|        EECCA countries 1996-2004~ ~Hazardous waste generation in the
37  III,    10.  4.  5|           the long-term storage of hazardous waste generated during the
38  III,    10.  4.  5|            EU Waste legislation on hazardous waste (Directive 91/689/
39  III,    10.  4.  5|     consensus.~ ~Since the cost of hazardous waste disposal is much lower
40  III,    10.  4.  5|       economic incentive to export hazardous waste. All EECCA and SEE
41  III,    10.  4.  5|         Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal,
42  III,    10.  4.  5|           for the safe disposal of hazardous waste and, therefore in
43  III,    10.  4.  5|            Directive 91/689/EEC on hazardous waste. Available at: htt ~ ~
44  III,    10.  4.  5|          effects of residence near hazardous waste landfill sites: A
45  III,    10.  5.  1|     Housing can lead to the use of hazardous construction material and
46  III,    10.  5.  3|            them to new potentially hazardous physical and chemical substances
47   IV,    12.  2    | Healthcare-based interventions for hazardous and harmful alcohol consumption
48   IV,    12.  2    |     interventions for persons with hazardous and harmful alcohol use
49   IV,    12. 10    |         Health~in order to prevent hazardous alcohol consumption amongst
50   IV,    12. 10    |          the production and use of hazardous chemicals (“the dirty dozen”,
51   IV,    12. 10    |          of the population against hazardous noise is under the responsibility
52   IV,    12. 10    |  restriction of the use of certain hazardous substances in electrical
53   IV,    12. 10    |         Plan for the Management of Hazardous Waste”,~o Ministerial Decision
54   IV,    12. 10    |  limitations for the management of hazardous waste in compliance with
55   IV,    12. 10    |          Directive 91/689 “for the hazardous waste” of 12th December
56   IV,    12. 10    |        their personnel in handling hazardous medical waste. Also, hospitals