Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    I,     2.Acr    |        Sixth Framework Programme~GDP~Gross Domestic Product~HTA~
 2    I,     2.  1    |    current output of about 7% of GDP in the EU15, larger in EU15
 3    I,     2.  4    |      EUGLOREH Countries, 2007.~ ~GDP is defined as the produced
 4    I,     2.  4    |        the annual growth rate of GDP per capita at constant prices
 5    I,     2.  4    |          the growth rate of real GDP over the last 10 years of
 6    I,     2.  4    |         estimates1 indicate that GDP in the Euro Area and in
 7   II,     5.  3.Acr|    Fighting Against Cancer Today~GDP~Gross Domestic Product~HPV~
 8   II,     5.  3.  1|          Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and their trends are subdivided
 9   II,     5.  3.  5|       negatively associated with GDP levels, both for men and
10   II,     5.  3.  5|         countries with a similar GDP. In 2006 Western Europe
11   II,     5.  3.  5|         countries with a similar GDP. In 2006 Iceland was the
12   II,     5.  3.  5|      seems to be associated with GDP.~Figure 5.3.19 shows that
13   II,     5.  3.  5|       negatively associated with GDP (Figure 5.3.21). This could
14   II,     5.  3.  5|  countries. Countries with lower GDP may have difficulties to
15   II,     5.  3.  5|       positively associated with GDP (Figure 5.3.25) possibly
16   II,     5.  3.  6|     other countries with similar GDP both for men and women.
17   II,     5.  5.Int|         of 3% to 4% of the total GDP9.~ ~There are gender-specific
18   II,     5. 14.  3|        an average of 0.5% of the GDP, or approximately 1/17th
19   II,     5. 14.  3|         oral health: 0.8% of the GDP. France falls in the middle
20   II,     5. 14.  3|          middle with 9.3% of the GDP devoted to health care and
21   II,     9.  3.  1|   reduction of 3% to 4% of total GDP (Gabriel and Liimatainen,
22  III,    10.  2.  1|    Convention on Tobacco Control~GDP~Gross Domestic Product~NCDs~
23  III,    10.  2.  1|     equivalent of 1% of region's GDP.~ ~Success of interventions
24  III,    10.  2.  1|   smoking probably exceeds 1% of GDP in Europe. The impact of
25  III,    10.  2.  1|         about 1% of the region’s GDP. The indirect costs of smoking
26  III,    10.  2.  1|         between 2.1% and 3.4% of GDP (ASPECT, 2004; Collins &
27  III,    10.  2.  1|      year, equivalent to 1.3% of GDP. Actual spending on alcohol-related
28  III,    10.  2.  1|       government revenue or % of GDP) and per capita consumption (
29  III,    10.  3.  1|         pollution is about 1% of GDP (Martin et al. 2006). In
30  III,    10.  3.  2|         the European Communities~GDP~Gross Domestic Product~HCB~
31  III,    10.  3.  2|       have grown faster than the GDP. The economic cost of late
32  III,    10.  3.  2|          gross domestic product (GDP) over the past ten years,
33  III,    10.  3.  2|  chemicals increasing by 31% and GDP by 25% between 1995 and
34  III,    10.  3.  2| industrial chemicals relative to GDP for EU Member States 1995–
35  III,    10.  4.  5|      both imports and exports in GDP grew from 27% in 1990 to
36  III,    10.  4.  5|      Turkey, share of exports in GDP increased from 16%-31%,
37  III,    10.  4.  5|          European countries, the GDP share of imports grew from
38  III,    10.  5.  2|  problems~EU countries with high GDP~Austria, Belgium, Denmark,
39  III,    10.  5.  2|      countries with intermediate GDP~Cyprus, Czech Republic,
40  III,    10.  5.  2|            EU countries with low GDP~Estonia, Hungary, Latvia,
41  III,    10.  5.  2|         the European Communities~GDP~ Gross Domestic Product~
42  III,    10.  5.  3|        loss amounting to 45% of GDP. Estimates expect 2.0 million
43  III,    10.  5.  3|         Working Condition Survey~GDP~Gross Domestic Product~HSWA~
44   IV,    11.  2.  1|     determinants of health (e.g. GDP and behavioural factors)
45   IV,    11.  6.  1|      outpacing the 37% growth in GDP per capita. In 1970, health
46   IV,    11.  6.  1|         accounted for just 5% of GDP. By 1990, this share had
47   IV,    11.  6.  1|      spending as a percentage of GDP remained relatively stable
48   IV,    11.  6.  1|       been rising at the pace of GDP, health care tends to grow
49   IV,    11.  6.  1|    increase in the proportion of GDP spent on healthcare (OECD
50   IV,    11.  6.  1|     decline in the proportion of GDP spent on healthcare. In
51   IV,    11.  6.  1|         Germany’s at over 10% of GDP. Meanwhile, following a
52   IV,    11.  6.  1|        measured by proportion of GDP) except Croatia, Estonia,
53   IV,    11.  6.  1|           which reached 15.3% of GDP in 2005, or $6401 per capita (
54   IV,    11.  6.  1|   expenditure as a percentage of GDP, 1990-2004~ ~Table 11.10.
55   IV,    11.  6.  2|       spending from 7.3% to 8.3% GDP in a four-year period (2000-
56   IV,    12.  2    |       government revenue or % of GDP) and per capita consumption.