Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5.  4.  1|           to the retina, leading to visual disturbance and blindness (
 2   II,     5.  5.  3|    condition followed by hearing or visual impairments, cerebral palsy,
 3   II,     5.  5.  3|    neurological dysfunctions (e.g., visual and sensory disturbances,
 4   II,     5.  5.  3|         sensory, bowel and bladder, visual, cerebral, other) by assigning
 5   II,     8.  2.  1|      Rowe1998; Mason & Scior 2004). Visual and dental care needs are
 6   II,     8.  2.  2|                              8.2.2. Visual impairment and blindness~ ~
 7   II,     8.  2.  2|             The economic effects of visual impairment can be divided
 8   II,     8.  2.  2|            caregivers and costs for visual aids, equipment, home modifications,
 9   II,     8.  2.  2|          death that can result from visual impairment.~ ~
10   II,     8.  2.  2|         prevalence of blindness and visual impairment have been carried
11   II,     8.  2.  2|         update of available data on visual impairment (Pascolini et
12   II,     8.  2.  2|              2007).~ ~Definitions~ ~Visual impairment includes low
13   II,     8.  2.  2|            Low vision is defined as visual acuity of less than 6/18,
14   II,     8.  2.  2|            3/60, or a corresponding visual field loss to less than
15   II,     8.  2.  2|         possible correction (ICD-10 visual impairment categories 1
16   II,     8.  2.  2|            the ICD-10 categories of visual impairment proposed in 2003
17   II,     8.  2.  2|            two categories: moderate visual impairment (presenting visual
18   II,     8.  2.  2|       visual impairment (presenting visual acuity less than 6/18 but
19   II,     8.  2.  2|        better than 6/60) and severe visual impairment (presenting visual
20   II,     8.  2.  2|       visual impairment (presenting visual acuity less than 6/60 but
21   II,     8.  2.  2|             Blindness is defined as visual acuity of less than 3/60,
22   II,     8.  2.  2|            3/60, or a corresponding visual field loss to less than
23   II,     8.  2.  2|         possible correction (ICD-10 visual impairment categories 3,
24   II,     8.  2.  2|             5).~ ~The definition of visual impairment in the International
25   II,     8.  2.  2|        best-correctedvision, i.e. visual acuity obtained with the
26   II,     8.  2.  2|             Presenting vision, i.e. visual activity obtained with current
27   II,     8.  2.  2|           been used to characterize visual impairment faced by people
28   II,     8.  2.  2|         people in daily activities.~Visual impairment caused by uncorrected
29   II,     8.  2.  2|     refractive errors is defined as visual acuity of less that 6/18
30   II,     8.  2.  2|   predefined criteria, of survey of visual impairment, was carried
31   II,     8.  2.  2|             than men to suffer from visual impairment. An estimation
32   II,     8.  2.  2|    impairment. An estimation of the visual impairment due to uncorrected
33   II,     8.  2.  2|   predefined criteria, of survey of visual impairment, was carried
34   II,     8.  2.  2|             than men to suffer from visual impairment. An estimation
35   II,     8.  2.  2|    impairment. An estimation of the visual impairment due to uncorrected
36   II,     8.  2.  2|      preventing avoidable causes of visual impairment, including inadequately
37   II,     8.  2.  2|     projected doubling of avoidable visual impairment between 1990
38   II,     8.  2.  2|             avoidable blindness and visual impairment’, which expanded
39   II,     8.  2.  2|         prevention of blindness and visual impairment remain disease
40   II,     8.  2.  2|             prevention of avoidable visual impairment will be achieved
41   II,     8.  2.  2|           and outcomes of childhood visual disorders. Ophtalmic Epidemiology
42   II,     8.  2.  2|            A. (1999): Prevalence of visual impairment in children:
43   II,     8.  2.  2|             L. (2005): Incidence of visual loss in the Ponza Eye Study,
44   II,     8.  2.  2|         update of available data on visual impairment: a compilation
45   II,     8.  2.  2|           SP (2004): Global data on visual impairment in the year 2002.
46   II,     8.  2.  2|          2008): Global magnitude of visual impairment caused by uncorrected
47   II,     8.  2.  2| characterization of vision loss and visual functioning. Geneva 4-5
48   II,     9        |           use of assistive devices, visual deficit, arthritis, impaired
49   II,     9        |             number of risk factors. Visual performance, medical problems,
50   II,     9.  1.  1| disabilities, chronic lung disease, visual and hearing impairments
51   II,     9.  3.  1|             is often accompanied by visual acuity loss among older
52   II,     9.  4.  4|           use of assistive devices, visual deficit, arthritis, impaired
53   II,     9.  4.  4|             number of risk factors. Visual performance, medical problems,
54   IV,    12.  1    |           Information~Society~Audio visual~policy~Television Without~
55  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|             victims~violence~vision~visual~vulnerability~vulnerable~