EUGLOREH project
THE STATUS OF HEALTH IN THE EUROPEAN UNION:
TOWARDS A HEALTHIER EUROPE

FULL REPORT

PART II - HEALTH CONDITIONS

5. HEALTH IMPACTS OF NON COMMUNICABLE DISEASES AND RELATED TIME-TRENDS

5.14 Dental and oral diseases

5.14.4. Risk factors

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5.14.4. Risk factors

 

The caries decline observed in many developed countries was the result of a number of public health measures, associated to the different living conditions, lifestyles and improved self-care practices. Market globalization within Europe has a significant impact on dietary excess leading to chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, osteoporosis and oral diseases. Oral health is an integral part of systemic and nutritional health. Oral health and nutrition have a synergistic relationship. Dental diseases related to diet include dental caries, developmental defects of enamel, dental erosion and periodontal disease. Children and adolescents can benefit from diet analysis and modification. Diet analysis, along with professionally determined recommendations for maximal general and dental health, may be a part of an adolescent’s dental health management. Nutrition education by dental professionals must address dietary risk factors associated with oral disease. The effects of nutritional changes demonstrate how common risks influence public health, including oral hygiene. The public health community involved with oral health should gain an understanding of the health effects of these complex developments in order to prevent or control oral diseases

 

Currently available evidence shows that important risk factors for periodontal disease relate to poor oral hygiene, tobacco use, excessive alcohol consumption, stress, and diabetes mellitus. The focus of recent studies in periodontics is on systemic connections between untreated periodontal disease and other health problems, including heart disease, stroke, obstructive pulmonary disease and diabetes. It has already been shown time ago that some of these conditions (especially diabetes) worsen the periodontal status of patients already affected by periodontitis and make them 2-5 times more susceptible to develop severe periodontal disease.