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Alphabetical    [«  »]
stole 11
stolen 12
stomach 2
stone 188
stoned 10
stones 52
stoning 2
Frequency    [«  »]
188 capital
188 finite
188 joan
188 stone
187 commandment
187 conceived
187 despair
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

stone

    Part, Question
1 1, 1 | For ~example, man, ass, stone agree in the one precise 2 1, 1 | faculty or habit, as man and stone are referred to the faculty 3 1, 7 | another; for He is not a stone or wood. Therefore God is ~ 4 1, 12 | as the similitude of a stone is in the eye, whereby the 5 1, 12 | whereas the substance of the stone is not there. But if ~the 6 1, 13 | for instance, this name "stone" [lapis] is imposed from 7 1, 13 | hurts the foot would be a stone [*This refers ~to the Latin 8 1, 13 | as ~when we say, God is a stone, or a lion, or the like. 9 1, 13 | signification of the name itself as "stone" signifies a material being, ~ 10 1, 13 | than of God, as "lion," "stone," and the ~like. Therefore 11 1, 13 | name the substance of a stone from its act, as for ~instance 12 1, 13 | particular action, but the stone's substance. ~The things, 13 1, 13 | because we can know ~what stone is in itself from its property, 14 1, 13 | its property, this name "stone" signifies ~the nature of 15 1, 13 | signifies ~the nature of the stone itself; for it signifies 16 1, 13 | signifies the definition of stone, ~by which we know what 17 1, 13 | signify by the same ~name a stone, or something else. Hence 18 1, 14 | in De ~Anima iii. For "a stone is not in the soul, but 19 1, 14 | the eye does not know a stone ~according to the existence 20 1, 14 | but by the image of the ~stone which is in the eye, the 21 1, 14 | the eye, the eye knows the stone according to its ~existence 22 1, 14 | thus the intellect knows a stone according to the ~intelligible 23 1, 14 | nevertheless it knows what a stone is in its own ~nature. If 24 1, 14 | existence is ~attributed to a stone in itself, which is not 25 1, 16 | the divine mind. For a ~stone is called true, which possesses 26 1, 16 | possesses the nature proper to a stone, ~according to the preconception 27 1, 23 | artificer it depends ~that this stone is in part of the wall, 28 1, 28 | For ~when we understand a stone; that which the intellect 29 1, 28 | because a man understands a stone by one act, and by another ~ 30 1, 28 | that he understands the stone, and again by another, ~ 31 1, 33 | as, for instance, if a stone be called a dead thing, 32 1, 34 | act ~of understanding a stone, speaks a stone. Anselm 33 1, 34 | understanding a stone, speaks a stone. Anselm took the term "speak" ~ 34 1, 39 | person; as we may say, "this ~stone," and "this ass." So, speaking 35 1, 46 | that man, or heaven, or a stone were not always. ~Likewise 36 1, 46 | effect; for instance, that a stone be ~moved by a stick, the 37 1, 48 | sight is not an evil in a stone, but it is an evil in an 38 1, 48 | against the nature of a stone to see. So, likewise, it 39 1, 56 | power which ~knows it, as a stone is seen by the eye from 40 1, 59 | things; thus the name of a ~stone [lapis] is derived from 41 1, 59 | this alone belongs to a stone. In the same way the irascible 42 1, 67 | sense as He is called the Stone; the former is to be ~taken 43 1, 70 | sun was a fiery mass of ~stone, and neither a god nor even 44 1, 75 | for instance, ~it knows a stone absolutely as a stone; and 45 1, 75 | a stone absolutely as a stone; and therefore the form 46 1, 75 | therefore the form of a stone ~absolutely, as to its proper 47 1, 76 | there ~one phantasm of a stone in me, and another in you - 48 1, 76 | different ~phantasms of a stone; yet from all of them only 49 1, 76 | intelligible species ~of a stone is abstracted; by which 50 1, 76 | understands the nature of a stone, notwithstanding the ~diversity 51 1, 76 | to its likeness; for "the stone is not in the soul, ~but 52 1, 76 | Anima iii, 8. Yet it is the stone ~which is understood, not 53 1, 76 | not the likeness of the stone; except by a ~reflection 54 1, 76 | instance, the form of a stone, or of any sort of ~soul.~ 55 1, 76 | of a painted animal or a ~stone animal; so is it with the 56 1, 77 | great or small, a man or a ~stone. Therefore by reason of 57 1, 39 | person; as we may say, "this ~stone," and "this ass." So, speaking 58 1, 47 | that man, or heaven, or a stone were not always. ~Likewise 59 1, 47 | effect; for instance, that a stone be ~moved by a stick, the 60 1, 49 | sight is not an evil in a stone, but it is an evil in an 61 1, 49 | against the nature of a stone to see. So, likewise, it 62 1, 57 | power which ~knows it, as a stone is seen by the eye from 63 1, 60 | things; thus the name of a ~stone [lapis] is derived from 64 1, 60 | this alone belongs to a stone. In the same way the irascible 65 1, 68 | sense as He is called the Stone; the former is to be ~taken 66 1, 71 | sun was a fiery mass of ~stone, and neither a god nor even 67 1, 74 | for instance, ~it knows a stone absolutely as a stone; and 68 1, 74 | a stone absolutely as a stone; and therefore the form 69 1, 74 | therefore the form of a stone ~absolutely, as to its proper 70 1, 75 | there ~one phantasm of a stone in me, and another in you - 71 1, 75 | different ~phantasms of a stone; yet from all of them only 72 1, 75 | intelligible species ~of a stone is abstracted; by which 73 1, 75 | understands the nature of a stone, notwithstanding the ~diversity 74 1, 75 | to its likeness; for "the stone is not in the soul, ~but 75 1, 75 | Anima iii, 8. Yet it is the stone ~which is understood, not 76 1, 75 | not the likeness of the stone; except by a ~reflection 77 1, 75 | instance, the form of a stone, or of any sort of ~soul.~ 78 1, 75 | of a painted animal or a ~stone animal; so is it with the 79 1, 76 | great or small, a man or a ~stone. Therefore by reason of 80 1, 81 | other species of things, as stone or wood, which are ~contained 81 1, 82 | without ~judgment; as a stone moves downwards; and in 82 1, 83 | participating the idea of a stone, becomes an individuating 83 1, 83 | becomes an individuating stone, so our ~intellect, by participating 84 1, 83 | participating the idea of a stone, is made to understand a ~ 85 1, 83 | is made to understand a ~stone. Now participation of an 86 1, 83 | participating the idea of a stone becomes a stone, so our ~ 87 1, 83 | idea of a stone becomes a stone, so our ~intellect, by participating 88 1, 83 | idea, has knowledge of a stone. But ~since it seems contrary 89 1, 83 | belongs to the nature of a stone to be in an individual ~ 90 1, 83 | to be in an individual ~stone, and to the nature of a 91 1, 83 | Wherefore the nature of a stone or any material thing cannot 92 1, 83 | to know the nature of a ~stone and of a horse, save for 93 1, 84 | material thing, such as a ~stone, or a man, or a horse, can 94 1, 84 | abstracted the species of a stone from its ~matter in such 95 1, 84 | iii, 8), who says "that a stone is not in the soul, ~but 96 1, 84 | only the likeness of the stone"; it follows that the soul 97 1, 86 | intellect understands a stone is distinct from the act ~ 98 1, 86 | understands that it understands a stone; and so on. Nor is ~there 99 1, 88 | Thus that a person see a stone is due to the species of 100 1, 88 | due to the species of the ~stone in his eye; but that he 101 1, 92 | human mind the species of a stone is specifically ~different 102 1, 104 | homicide is not ascribed to the stone, but to the ~thrower. Therefore, 103 1, 109 | a miracle by throwing a stone upwards, as ~such a thing 104 1, 109 | outside the order of the stone's nature. So for a miracle ~ 105 1, 118 | for instance, wood or ~stone - "so in flesh, there is 106 2, 3 | evident that the form of a stone or of any sensible, is ~ 107 2, 3 | perfected by the form ~of a stone, as such, but inasmuch as 108 2, 6 | acts is outside. For when a stone is ~moved upwards, the principle 109 2, 6 | movement is outside the stone: ~whereas when it is moved 110 2, 6 | this movement is in ~the stone. Now of those things that 111 2, 6 | inclination or ~movement. For a stone may have an upward movement 112 2, 9 | movement in that thing. For a stone is moved upwards by a man, ~ 113 2, 9 | is not the cause of the stone's nature, but this movement 114 2, 9 | movement is not ~natural to the stone; but the natural movement 115 2, 9 | natural movement of the stone is caused by ~no other than 116 2, 15 | appetite: thus to touch a stone is an ~action suitable to 117 2, 15 | stick so that it touch the ~stone, belongs to one who has 118 2, 19 | if a man were to throw a stone with a murderous intention, ~ 119 2, 40 | appetite; thus we say that a stone is ~certain to tend downwards. 120 2, 52 | of ~water hollow out the stone: but the multiplication 121 2, 71 | contrary to nature: thus "a stone never becomes habituated 122 2, 85 | moves accidentally the ~stone resting thereon." In this 123 2, 88 | is said ~to displace the stone that rests on it. Accordingly 124 2, 99 | wrote ~in two tables of stone; and He commanded me at 125 2, 100 | wrote in two ~tablets of stone."~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[100] 126 2, 102 | give thee two tables of ~stone, and the Law, and the commandments 127 2, 102 | the rational was placed a ~stone which changed color according 128 2, 103 | that "Jacob . . . took the stone . . . and set it ~up for 129 2, 106 | was ~written on tables of stone, so is the law of faith 130 2, 106 | Law written on tables of stone: ~whereas He gave the New 131 2, 109 | natural ~coldness, and a stone cast upwards returns by 132 2, 113 | water to be heated, or for a stone to be thrown upwards; but 133 2, 23 | many drops hollow out a stone.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[24] A[ 134 2, 61 | As he ~that casteth a stone into the heap of Mercury, 135 2, 90 | sometimes: for "lapis" [a stone] takes its name from hurting 136 2, 90 | hurts ~the foot, would be a stone. In like manner it does 137 2, 93 | wood, iron or ~polished stone, it is called "geomancy," 138 2, 93 | earthquake occur when a stone falls, or that a treasure ~ 139 2, 94 | twitching of a limb; a ~stone, a dog, or a boy coming 140 2, 120 | name of God to wood or ~stone," as though they forbade 141 2, 173 | inclination - for ~instance a stone, which is naturally inclined 142 2, 173 | tending - for ~instance a stone may be thrown downwards 143 2, 181 | Hom. xxi in Ezech.): "The stone is foursquare, and is ~stable 144 2, 183 | contrary ~directions; thus if a stone be naturally moved downwards, 145 3, 11 | Zach. 3:9) that on "one" stone, i.e. ~Christ, "there are 146 3, 25 | whatever - for instance, in stone or wood, silver or ~gold - 147 3, 29 | the men of the city shall stone her to death, and she shall 148 3, 42 | Christ would be "for a ~stone of stumbling and for a rock 149 3, 42 | give thee" two "tables of stone and the law, and the ~commandments 150 3, 42 | living God; ~not in tables of stone, but in the fleshly tables 151 3, 45 | to hurl Him down or ~to stone Him. And yet He is not said, 152 3, 47 | they wanted to), but to stone Him, as they did to ~Stephen. 153 3, 51 | tomb." Hence the "great stone" which was set shows ~that " 154 3, 51 | into ~our hearts, a great stone is rolled against the door." 155 3, 51 | that "'he rolled a great stone,' because all things ~around 156 3, 53 | to say: "And she saw the stone taken away from the sepulchre." 157 3, 55 | described as sitting upon the ~stone rolled back, while Mark 158 3, 55 | angel ~sitting upon the stone which was rolled back from 159 3, 60 | metaphorically, sometimes by a stone (2 Kgs. 22:2; Zach. ~3:9; 160 3, 70 | knife more commonly than a stone knife. Therefore circumcision 161 3, 70 | have been performed with a stone knife.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[ 162 3, 70 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: A stone knife was not essential 163 3, 70 | having been performed with a ~stone knife, thus (Ex. 4:25) we 164 3, 70 | Sephora took a very sharp ~stone and circumcised the foreskin 165 3, 70 | Make ~thee knives of stone, and circumcise the second 166 3, 77 | surrounding them, such as iron or stone, which remain entire after 167 3, 83 | if thou make an altar of stone unto Me, thou ~shalt not 168 3, 83 | exclusive use of altars made of stone.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[83] A[ 169 3, 83 | the chalice ought to be of stone, and not of gold or of silver 170 3, 83 | 1, "altars, if not of ~stone, are not to be consecrated 171 3, 83 | Christ's body was laid in a stone sepulchre. ~This is also 172 3, 83 | of the sacrament. Because stone is ~solid, and may be found 173 3, 83 | and the same applies to stone. Consequently, out of reverence ~ 174 3, 83 | the chalice is not made of stone, ~yet the corporal is made 175 3, 87 | you, let him first ~cast a stone at her," a gloss says that " 176 Suppl, 33| than the anointing of a ~stone. But the anointing of an 177 Suppl, 33| Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: The stone is anointed in order that 178 Suppl, 33| be ~consecrated, and the stone remains consecrated, as 179 Suppl, 72| violent upward movement of a ~stone which terminates in a violent 180 Suppl, 72| downward ~movement of a stone. And there is another movement 181 Suppl, 89| since by the form of a stone we see a ~stone: whereas 182 Suppl, 89| form of a stone we see a ~stone: whereas the efficacy of 183 Suppl, 89| intellect understanding a stone is ~not like it in its natural 184 Suppl, 89| instance by the form of a stone to know a stone. The third 185 Suppl, 89| form of a stone to know a stone. The third is ~the medium " 186 Suppl, 89| sometimes the sight sees not a stone, through the image ~of the 187 Suppl, 89| through the image ~of the stone not being united to it. 188 Suppl, 89| thing itself, whereas the stone is seen through ~its proper


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