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Alphabetical    [«  »]
report 10
reported 4
reports 6
repose 69
reposes 7
reposing 2
reprehend 1
Frequency    [«  »]
69 praying
69 princes
69 puts
69 repose
69 respective
69 satisfy
69 sudden
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

repose

   Part, Question
1 1, 10 | movement but it also ~measures repose, which belongs to whatever 2 1, 53 | rest that the subject in repose be not otherwise ~disposed 3 1, 59 | glad is for the will to repose in some good ~possessed. 4 1, 68 | lower, the place of their repose.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[68] A[ 5 1, 54 | rest that the subject in repose be not otherwise ~disposed 6 1, 60 | glad is for the will to repose in some good ~possessed. 7 1, 69 | lower, the place of their repose.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[68] A[ 8 2, 1 | things, viz. ~"in pleasure, repose, the gifts of nature, and 9 2, 4 | delight consists in a certain repose of the will. Now that ~the 10 2, 4 | an ~operation, the will's repose is caused by the goodness 11 2, 4 | seek good for the sake of repose; for thus the very act ~ 12 2, 4 | enjoyment, which implies repose of the lover in the object 13 2, 12 | intention does, but absolute repose in the end.~Aquin.: SMT 14 2, 18 | directed to the support or repose of his body, ~it is also 15 2, 23 | except the ~appetite's repose in the good obtained; which 16 2, 23 | the good obtained; which repose belongs to joy, ~which is 17 2, 25 | something belonging to ~repose, e.g. joy and sadness. But 18 2, 25 | is ~nothing pertaining to repose, and only that which belongs 19 2, 31 | though delight is a ~certain repose of the appetite, if we consider 20 2, 31 | essential: such are movement, repose, speech ~and such like. 21 2, 31 | there is a difference of repose corresponding to the difference 22 2, 31 | emotions of the soul what repose is to bodies. But the appetite 23 2, 31 | a ~natural body does not repose save in a connatural place. 24 2, 31 | Neither, ~therefore, can the repose of the animal appetite, 25 2, 31 | the soul, is likened to ~repose in natural bodies, as stated 26 2, 31 | above (Q[23], A[4]). Now one repose ~is said to be contrary 27 2, 31 | contrary termini; ~thus, "repose in a high place is contrary 28 2, 31 | high place is contrary to repose in a low place" ~(Phys. 29 2, 31 | is likened to ~natural repose in bodies: because its object 30 2, 31 | sadness is like a violent repose; because ~its object is 31 2, 31 | as the place of ~violent repose is disagreeable to the natural 32 2, 31 | natural appetite. Now natural ~repose is contrary both to violent 33 2, 31 | contrary both to violent repose of the same body, and to 34 2, 31 | body, and to the ~natural repose of another, as stated in 35 2, 32 | other things pertaining to repose, ~are pleasant, inasmuch 36 2, 33 | all movement ceases when repose is reached. But pleasure 37 2, 33 | as ~it were, a certain repose of the movement of desire, 38 2, 33 | use of reason. ~Because repose facilitates very much the 39 2, 33 | go into my house, I shall repose myself with her," i.e. wisdom. 40 2, 33 | But ~pleasure is a kind of repose. Therefore it helps rather 41 2, 33 | pleasure implies indeed repose of the appetite in ~the 42 2, 33 | object of pleasure; which repose is sometimes contrary to 43 2, 33 | is pleasure, denoting the repose of the ~appetite in a good 44 2, 34 | evil. For pleasure is a repose of the appetitive power 45 2, 34 | there is a certain natural repose, whereby a thing ~rests 46 2, 34 | and again an unnatural repose, whereby a thing ~rests 47 2, 34 | And since pleasure is the repose of the appetite in ~some 48 2, 34 | But if a man's ~appetite repose in that which is good, not 49 2, 34 | something else is because it is repose in the end. Now the end 50 2, 34 | since pleasure is the repose of the appetite in good. 51 2, 34 | fact that it is perfect repose in ~the perfect good. Hence 52 2, 34 | the will reposes: and the repose of the will and of every ~ 53 2, 34 | point of their being the ~repose of the appetite in something 54 2, 37 | which requires complete repose, than inward sorrow is. ~ 55 2, 38 | pleasure is a kind of repose of the appetite in a suitable 56 2, 38 | sorrow, what, in bodies, repose ~is to weariness, which 57 2, 38 | Therefore just as all repose of the body brings relief 58 2, 40 | contrary to movement: while repose is in ~opposition to movement 59 2, 44 | because every passion disturbs repose, ~which is requisite for 60 2, 100| moral precept, ~requires repose of the heart in God. Or, 61 2, 100| chief and final was the ~repose of the mind in God, either, 62 2, 100| future life, by glory; which repose was also foreshadowed in 63 2, 100| transitory, brought us to the repose of the spiritual ~Sabbath. 64 2, 33 | toil, ~and love of bodily repose seem to be due to the same 65 2, 33 | he is inclined to undue repose, it is sloth: and of sorrow 66 2, 177| enter into my house, I shall repose myself with ~her." Therefore 67 2, 178| go into my house, I shall repose myself with her." ~Now movement 68 3, 66 | whereby we mount to the repose of the ~heavenly kingdom"; 69 3, 83 | present ~peace, but for the repose of the dead, the "Pax" is


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