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Alphabetical    [«  »]
last 830
last-mentioned 1
lasted 4
lasting 41
lastingly 1
lastingness 1
lastly 55
Frequency    [«  »]
41 humor
41 insufficient
41 kindness
41 lasting
41 mingled
41 modes
41 osee
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

lasting

   Part, Question
1 2, 20 | will of the latter is more lasting in good ~or evil, and in 2 2, 31 | Delight is said to be long lasting or morose, according as ~ 3 2, 42 | merely in the point of their lasting long or ~for ever. Consequently 4 2, 42 | easily, are considered as lasting for ever or for a long time: 5 2, 42 | like good is no better ~for lasting long or for ever: its goodness 6 2, 46 | hatred ensues from a more lasting cause than anger ~does. 7 2, 46 | habit, so anger is less lasting than hatred; although hatred 8 2, 49 | whether it be transitory or lasting. But in them, we do ~not 9 2, 53 | i, 10), "virtue is more lasting than ~learning."~Aquin.: 10 2, 53 | said ~that "virtue is more lasting than learning," this must 11 2, 53 | act. For habits are more lasting than passion-like ~qualities, 12 2, 66 | more necessary, and more lasting, is ~better. Now the moral 13 2, 66 | moral virtues are "more lasting even than the sciences" ~( 14 2, 66 | The moral virtues are more lasting than the intellectual ~virtues, 15 2, 66 | and invariable, are more lasting than the objects of moral ~ 16 2, 71 | bad act. For, as the more lasting a good is, the better it 17 2, 71 | a vicious habit is more ~lasting than vicious acts, that 18 2, 71 | fact that habit is more lasting than act, is ~accidental 19 2, 88 | because anger is ~said to be lasting, and delectation to be morose, 20 2, 102 | of ~corruption was of a lasting nature, to be destroyed; 21 2, 102 | states of the Law (the first lasting from Abraham to David, the ~ 22 2, 132 | or ~things that are of a lasting nature; thus it belongs 23 2, 134 | adding "continued" or "long lasting," he refers to longanimity, 24 2, 139 | cause, wherefore it is more ~lasting and more general, and consequently 25 2, 156 | that it gives rise to a lasting displeasure, ~wherefore 26 2, 179 | OBJ 3: Further, the more lasting a thing is in itself, the 27 2, 179 | life is seemingly more ~lasting in itself: for Gregory says ( 28 3, 63 | chance, of a nature less lasting than this bodily mark?"~ 29 3, 63 | sacraments are not less lasting than the bodily mark" of 30 Suppl, 49| is not conditioned by a lasting inseparability. Consequently ~ 31 Suppl, 49| is a consent to an ever lasting ~bond, else it would not 32 Suppl, 52| with marriage, which is a lasting tie ~so long as this life 33 Suppl, 54| man has ~she instilled a lasting solicitude for his children 34 Suppl, 55| betrothal. For ~affinity is a lasting tie: whereas a betrothal 35 Suppl, 55| wherefore just as marriage is a lasting tie, so is the ~aforesaid 36 Suppl, 56| Reply OBJ 2: Marriage is a lasting bond, wherefore no supervening ~ 37 Suppl, 64| an issue of this kind is lasting and ~continuous, so that 38 Suppl, 64| this ~kind is continual or lasting like leprosy: wherefore 39 Suppl, 65| indissoluble or at least of a lasting ~nature, as shown above ( 40 Suppl, 92| and body adequate to life, lasting for ever in eternal bliss." 41 Suppl, 93| inasmuch as it is ~more lasting and threatens us at closer


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