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desirability 8
desirable 96
desirableness 3
desire 1218
desired 202
desirer 4
desires 391
Frequency    [«  »]
1221 name
1220 away
1218 case
1218 desire
1213 alone
1211 among
1208 judgment
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

desire

1-500 | 501-1000 | 1001-1218

     Part, Question
1 1, 5 | Goodness is what all desire." Now it is ~clear that 2 1, 5 | it is perfect; for all ~desire their own perfection. But 3 1, 5 | not its property, but to desire.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[5] A[3] 4 1, 5 | is that which all things desire, and since ~this has the 5 1, 5 | goodness being what all ~things desire); and therefore it has the 6 1, 6 | good is what all things desire. But all things do ~not 7 1, 6 | But all things do ~not desire God, because all things 8 1, 6 | desiring their own perfection, desire God ~Himself, inasmuch as 9 1, 6 | so of those things which desire God, some know Him as He 10 1, 6 | knowledge; others have a natural desire without knowledge, as being ~ 11 1, 6 | Further, "Good is what all desire," as the Philosopher says ~( 12 1, 6 | Ethic. i, 1). Now what all desire is nothing but God, Who 13 1, 6 | say that good is what all desire, it is not to be ~understood 14 1, 6 | good is what all things desire, since being itself is ~ 15 1, 12 | resides in every man a natural desire ~to know the cause of any 16 1, 12 | cause of things, the natural desire would remain void.~Aquin.: 17 1, 12 | charity, there is the more desire; and desire in a certain 18 1, 12 | is the more desire; and desire in a certain degree makes ~ 19 1, 12 | the ultimate end of our desire, so as to satisfy and ~quell 20 1, 12 | ultimate ~fulfilment of desire.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[12] A[ 21 1, 12 | all things, its ~natural desire will not rest satisfied; 22 1, 12 | Reply OBJ 4: The natural desire of the rational creature 23 1, 12 | intellect nor does its natural desire go out to these things; ~ 24 1, 12 | neither, again, does it desire to know things that exist 25 1, 12 | would so fill the ~natural desire of knowledge that nothing 26 1, 20 | present and possessed; whereas desire and hope regard good not 27 1, 20 | imperfection is implied, as ~in desire, which is of the good we 28 1, 20 | twofold - the love, namely, of desire, and the ~love of friendship. 29 1, 20 | creatures with the ~love of desire, since He needs no creature 30 1, 20 | it were with the love of desire, in so far ~as He orders 31 1, 20 | render to us. For we can desire a ~thing for others as well 32 1, 25 | more abundantly than we desire or understand."~Aquin.: 33 1, 44 | OBJ 3: Further, all things desire their end. But all things 34 1, 44 | But all things do not ~desire God, for all do not even 35 1, 44 | Reply OBJ 3: All things desire God as their end, when they 36 1, 44 | as their end, when they desire some ~good thing, whether 37 1, 44 | good thing, whether this desire be intellectual or sensible, 38 1, 58 | 1~OBJ 2: Further, since desire is of a thing not possessed 39 1, 58 | 12): "On Whom the angels desire to look." Therefore the ~ 40 1, 58 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: Such desire on the part of the angels 41 1, 58 | thereof. Or they are said to desire the ~vision of God with 42 1, 59 | imperfect; because it is a desire of something not as yet ~ 43 1, 59 | because choice is "the desire of something after taking 44 1, 60 | are caused by this natural desire; since whatever a ~man wills 45 1, 63 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 4: Further, desire is only of what is good 46 1, 63 | Therefore the angels can desire only what it truly good. ~ 47 1, 63 | the angel ~does not sin by desire.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[63] A[ 48 1, 63 | to be ~referred: as every desire of a subordinate ought to 49 1, 63 | appetite to tend to the desire of something involves on 50 1, 63 | seem that the devil did not desire to be as God. For ~what 51 1, 63 | apprehension, does not fall under desire; ~because the good which 52 1, 63 | sin consists only in such ~desire. But for any creature to 53 1, 63 | Therefore an angel ~could not desire to be as God.~Aquin.: SMT 54 1, 63 | would be against the natural desire; because there exists in ~ 55 1, 63 | everything the natural desire of preserving its own nature; 56 1, 63 | just as an ass does not desire to be a horse: for were 57 1, 63 | angel of lower degree to desire equality with a ~higher; 58 1, 63 | A[3] Body Para. 2/4~To desire to be as God according to 59 1, 63 | unto God. And so, if anyone desire in this way to be Godlike, 60 1, 63 | he would sin were he to desire ~to be like unto God even 61 1, 63 | In another way one may desire to be like unto God in some ~ 62 1, 63 | to one; as if one were to desire to create ~heaven and earth, 63 1, 63 | proper to God; in which desire there would be ~sin. It 64 1, 64 | Div. Nom. iv), that "they desire what is good and best, which ~ 65 1, 64 | remains in him according to ~desire; although not as to his 66 1, 64 | of happiness, which ~they desire naturally; and their wicked 67 1, 72 | they experience neither desire of ~propagation, nor sensation 68 1, 73 | On the other ~hand, the desire that tends to an object 69 1, 73 | other, the satisfying of desire. Now, in ~either sense God 70 1, 73 | Himself and fulfils His own desire. And even though from all ~ 71 1, 73 | new creatures, and to the desire tending to an external ~ 72 1, 75 | things that have knowledge, desire ensues upon ~knowledge. 73 1, 75 | to exist. But a natural desire cannot ~be in vain. Therefore 74 1, 45 | OBJ 3: Further, all things desire their end. But all things 75 1, 45 | But all things do not ~desire God, for all do not even 76 1, 45 | Reply OBJ 3: All things desire God as their end, when they 77 1, 45 | as their end, when they desire some ~good thing, whether 78 1, 45 | good thing, whether this desire be intellectual or sensible, 79 1, 59 | 1~OBJ 2: Further, since desire is of a thing not possessed 80 1, 59 | 12): "On Whom the angels desire to look." Therefore the ~ 81 1, 59 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: Such desire on the part of the angels 82 1, 59 | thereof. Or they are said to desire the ~vision of God with 83 1, 60 | imperfect; because it is a desire of something not as yet ~ 84 1, 60 | because choice is "the desire of something after taking 85 1, 61 | are caused by this natural desire; since whatever a ~man wills 86 1, 64 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 4: Further, desire is only of what is good 87 1, 64 | Therefore the angels can desire only what it truly good. ~ 88 1, 64 | the angel ~does not sin by desire.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[63] A[ 89 1, 64 | to be ~referred: as every desire of a subordinate ought to 90 1, 64 | appetite to tend to the desire of something involves on 91 1, 64 | seem that the devil did not desire to be as God. For ~what 92 1, 64 | apprehension, does not fall under desire; ~because the good which 93 1, 64 | sin consists only in such ~desire. But for any creature to 94 1, 64 | Therefore an angel ~could not desire to be as God.~Aquin.: SMT 95 1, 64 | would be against the natural desire; because there exists in ~ 96 1, 64 | everything the natural desire of preserving its own nature; 97 1, 64 | just as an ass does not desire to be a horse: for were 98 1, 64 | angel of lower degree to desire equality with a ~higher; 99 1, 64 | A[3] Body Para. 2/4~To desire to be as God according to 100 1, 64 | unto God. And so, if anyone desire in this way to be Godlike, 101 1, 64 | he would sin were he to desire ~to be like unto God even 102 1, 64 | In another way one may desire to be like unto God in some ~ 103 1, 64 | to one; as if one were to desire to create ~heaven and earth, 104 1, 64 | proper to God; in which desire there would be ~sin. It 105 1, 65 | Div. Nom. iv), that "they desire what is good and best, which ~ 106 1, 65 | remains in him according to ~desire; although not as to his 107 1, 65 | of happiness, which ~they desire naturally; and their wicked 108 1, 71 | they experience neither desire of ~propagation, nor sensation 109 1, 72 | On the other ~hand, the desire that tends to an object 110 1, 72 | other, the satisfying of desire. Now, in ~either sense God 111 1, 72 | Himself and fulfils His own desire. And even though from all ~ 112 1, 72 | new creatures, and to the desire tending to an external ~ 113 1, 74 | things that have knowledge, desire ensues upon ~knowledge. 114 1, 74 | to exist. But a natural desire cannot ~be in vain. Therefore 115 1, 77 | common to all the powers. Now desire is common to each ~power 116 1, 79 | inanimate things: since "all desire good," as the Philosopher ~ 117 1, 79 | their objects. But what we ~desire is the same as what we know. 118 1, 79 | which the animal is able to desire ~what it apprehends, and 119 1, 79 | intellectual appetite we may desire the immaterial good, which 120 1, 80 | bodily senses, since we desire ~things which are apprehended 121 1, 81 | Trin. xiii, 4) that "all desire ~happiness with one will." 122 1, 81 | iii, 9). Wherefore the ~desire of the ultimate end does 123 1, 81 | Therefore it does not desire of necessity all things 124 1, 81 | that, The will does not desire of necessity whatsoever 125 1, 81 | to God, just as now we ~desire of necessity to be happy. 126 1, 81 | that the will does ~not desire of necessity whatever it 127 1, 81 | from "concupiscere" [to desire], and the ~irascible part 128 1, 81 | concupiscence and anger," or "desire ~and animus."~Aquin.: SMT 129 1, 81 | concupiscible on account of its desire for good. And thus in the ~ 130 1, 82 | wishes - namely, "not to desire against reason," as ~Augustine 131 1, 82 | which is happiness. Which desire, indeed, is a ~natural desire, 132 1, 82 | desire, indeed, is a ~natural desire, and is not subject to free-will, 133 1, 82 | as we have said of the desire of ~happiness (Q[82], AA[ 134 1, 82 | 3) that choice is ~"the desire of those things which are 135 1, 82 | things which are in us." But desire is an act of the ~appetitive 136 1, 82 | describes choice as "a ~desire proceeding from counsel." 137 1, 82 | judgment by counsel, we desire in accordance with ~that 138 1, 82 | itself. But to "choose" is to desire something for the sake ~ 139 1, 94 | which a good-will could ~desire to have then, as Augustine 140 1, 94 | had at the proper time, as desire and hope that casteth not 141 1, 94 | desires as he ought ~to desire, and what he ought to desire, 142 1, 94 | desire, and what he ought to desire, as stated in Ethic. iii, 143 1, 95 | more or less, to ~action, desire, or knowledge; hence some 144 1, 95 | that man's good-will could desire," ~as Augustine says (De 145 1, 97 | innocence, but ardor of desire and ~restlessness of the 146 1, 97 | it excludes ~inordinate desire. In that state fecundity 147 1, 97 | was one, not of ~lustful desire, but of deliberate action."~ 148 1, 101 | nature of the soul; since the desire of heaven is implanted in ~ 149 1, 102 | this, that, as all things desire good, so do they ~desire 150 1, 102 | desire good, so do they ~desire unity; without which they 151 1, 102 | There is nothing that ~can desire or is able to resist this 152 1, 103 | all creatures naturally desire to be. Therefore no ~creature 153 1, 104 | God moves as the object of desire and ~apprehension. But He 154 1, 104 | God moves as the object of desire and apprehension; but it ~ 155 1, 106 | work, concerning which they desire enlightenment.~Aquin.: SMT 156 1, 107 | Thirdly, it signifies "the desire and participation of the 157 1, 110 | incites to thought, by the desire of the things thought of, 158 1, 113 | devil, men would ~have the desire for food and love and such 159 2, 1 | of one yet greater. But desire of the end is consequent 160 2, 1 | left besides ~it for man to desire. Which is not possible, 161 2, 1 | Therefore man does ~not desire all, whatsoever he desires, 162 2, 1 | Man must, of necessity, desire all, whatsoever he ~desires, 163 2, 1 | aspect of good. And ~if he desire it, not as his perfect good, 164 2, 1 | he must, ~of necessity, desire it as tending to the perfect 165 2, 1 | last end, remains in every desire directed to ~any object 166 2, 1 | the last end: since all desire the ~fulfilment of their 167 2, 1 | their last ~end: since some desire riches as their consummate 168 2, 1 | happiness; which all men desire, as ~Augustine says (De 169 2, 2 | OBJ 3: Further, since the desire for the sovereign good never 170 2, 2 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: The desire for natural riches is not 171 2, 2 | certain measure. But the desire for artificial ~wealth is 172 2, 2 | Polit. i, 3). Yet ~this desire for wealth is infinite otherwise 173 2, 2 | infinite otherwise than the desire for the ~sovereign good. 174 2, 2 | hunger." Whereas in the desire for wealth and ~for whatsoever 175 2, 2 | arises from his ~natural desire for happiness, from which 176 2, 2 | in power. For all things ~desire to become like to God, as 177 2, 2 | that which ~attracts the desire of all. But being itself 178 2, 2 | their proportion, ~some desire as to being only, some as 179 2, 2 | 1~OBJ 3: Further, since desire is for good, it seems that 180 2, 2 | it seems that what all desire ~is best. But all desire 181 2, 2 | desire ~is best. But all desire delight; both wise and foolish, 182 2, 2 | comes to the same whether we desire good, or desire ~delight, 183 2, 2 | whether we desire good, or desire ~delight, which is nothing 184 2, 2 | OBJ 2: The vehemence of desire for sensible delight arises 185 2, 2 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: All desire delight in the same way 186 2, 2 | in the same way as they desire good: and ~yet they desire 187 2, 2 | desire good: and ~yet they desire delight by reason of the 188 2, 2 | we love that for which we desire good, more than the ~good 189 2, 2 | more than the ~good that we desire for it: thus we love a friend 190 2, 2 | love a friend for whom we desire ~money, more than we love 191 2, 2 | the thing itself, which we desire to attain, and the use, 192 2, 2 | perfect good ~fulfilling the desire. Now man's appetite, otherwise 193 2, 2 | all goods that man can ~desire, thus the good of the soul 194 2, 2 | which lulls his natural ~desire. But man's natural desire 195 2, 2 | desire. But man's natural desire does not reach out to a 196 2, 2 | 102:5: "Who satisfieth thy desire with good things." Therefore 197 2, 3 | the thing itself which we desire to attain: thus ~for the 198 2, 3 | it ~is evident that the desire itself of the end is not 199 2, 3 | intelligible end. For at first we desire to attain an ~intelligible 200 2, 3 | he remains at peace, his desire being ~at rest.~Aquin.: 201 2, 3 | act of ~his will. But to desire nothing amiss is needed 202 2, 3 | Further, that which all desire for its own sake, seems 203 2, 3 | i, 1, "all men naturally desire ~to know"; and, a little 204 2, 3 | something remains for him to desire and seek: secondly, that 205 2, 3 | naturally remains in the man the desire to know about the cause, ~" 206 2, 3 | what it is." And this desire is one of wonder, and causes 207 2, 3 | remains in ~it the natural desire to seek the cause. Wherefore 208 2, 4 | the soul "has a natural desire ~to rule the body, the result 209 2, 4 | sufficient good and lulls desire. But ~this cannot be said 210 2, 4 | because they have a natural desire to ~rule the body."~Aquin.: 211 2, 4 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 5: The desire of the separated soul is 212 2, 4 | and besides Thee what do I desire upon earth?" As though to 213 2, 4 | As though to say: "I ~desire nothing but this," - "It 214 2, 4 | know, we may rise to the desire of things unknown," ~as 215 2, 5 | and because his will can ~desire it. And therefore man can 216 2, 5 | it brings rest to man's desire. But his desire is not at ~ 217 2, 5 | to man's desire. But his desire is not at ~rest, if he yet 218 2, 5 | evil, and fulfils every ~desire. But in this life every 219 2, 5 | Likewise neither can the desire for good be satiated in ~ 220 2, 5 | away, which we naturally desire to have, and would wish 221 2, 5 | it must needs set man's desire at rest and exclude ~every 222 2, 5 | would seem that not all desire Happiness. For no man can ~ 223 2, 5 | Happiness. For no man can ~desire what he knows not; since 224 2, 5 | things." Therefore not all desire ~Happiness.~Aquin.: SMT 225 2, 5 | Essence; wherefore they desire it not. ~Therefore all men 226 2, 5 | Therefore all men do not desire Happiness.~Aquin.: SMT FS 227 2, 5 | nothing amiss." But all do not desire ~this; for some desire certain 228 2, 5 | not desire ~this; for some desire certain things amiss, and 229 2, 5 | amiss, and yet they wish to desire ~such things. Therefore 230 2, 5 | things. Therefore all do not desire Happiness.~Aquin.: SMT FS 231 2, 5 | his ~will. Consequently to desire happiness is nothing else 232 2, 5 | is nothing else than to desire ~that one's will be satisfied. 233 2, 5 | in ~this respect, not all desire it. Wherefore the reply 234 2, 5 | satisfies man's natural desire, except the perfect ~good 235 2, 6 | appetite is roused to the desire of something. But this is 236 2, 6 | concupiscence ~inclines the will to desire the object of concupiscence. 237 2, 6 | according to Job 21:14: "We desire not the ~knowledge of Thy 238 2, 8 | will," and that "all things desire good."~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[ 239 2, 8 | the good is that which all desire."~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[8] A[ 240 2, 8 | it. Wherefore the ~actual desire of good is called "volition" [* 241 2, 9 | intellect flies ahead, the desire follows sluggishly ~or not 242 2, 10 | not, that I do - i.e. I desire"; yet it is in the power 243 2, 10 | the will ~not to will to desire or not to consent to concupiscence. 244 2, 11 | that which man does not desire for the sake of something 245 2, 11 | the Lord, he implied his desire to enjoy Him": as if we 246 2, 11 | fruits because "we should ~desire them for their own sake": 247 2, 13 | 3) that choice is ~"the desire of things in our power." 248 2, 13 | things in our power." But desire is an act of will. ~Therefore 249 2, 13 | that choice "is ~neither desire only, nor counsel only, 250 2, 13 | choose. For ~choice "is the desire of certain things on account 251 2, 13 | But irrational animals desire something on account of ~ 252 2, 13 | act for an end, and from desire. Therefore choice is ~in 253 2, 13 | 1~Reply OBJ 1: Not every desire of one thing on account 254 2, 14 | 2) that choice is the "desire of what has ~been already 255 2, 14 | do. For choice is the "desire of what is counselled" as 256 2, 15 | through some passion; desire, for instance, or anger. 257 2, 15 | Para. 1/1 ~OBJ 3: Further, desire of the means is choice, 258 2, 15 | apprehension of the ~end; then the desire of the end; then the counsel 259 2, 15 | about the means; then ~the desire of the means. Now the appetite 260 2, 15 | counsel presupposes the desire of the end. On the other ~ 261 2, 15 | On the other ~hand, the desire of the means presupposes 262 2, 16 | appetitive movement ~to the desire of something, as stated 263 2, 16 | certain end, are said to desire ~that end naturally. Yet 264 2, 17 | nutrition; for ~example the desire for pleasure in the act 265 2, 17 | the heart is warm with ~desire, the body remains cold." 266 2, 19 | in conformity with right ~desire." But right desire is a 267 2, 19 | right ~desire." But right desire is a good will. Therefore 268 2, 19 | because the will cannot desire a good that is not previously ~ 269 2, 19 | its conformity with the desire of a due end: ~nevertheless 270 2, 19 | nevertheless the very desire of the due end presupposes 271 2, 19 | sin is a ~deed, word or desire against the eternal law." 272 2, 19 | wills when ~several people desire different things, but not 273 2, 21 | sin is a word, deed, or desire, in opposition to the Eternal 274 2, 23 | in the irascible faculty; desire of virtue, in ~the concupiscible 275 2, 23 | just as "good is what all desire" (Ethic. i, ~1), so evil 276 2, 23 | the contrary, all things desire it. In like manner, nothing ~ 277 2, 23 | tends to it, as love, ~desire and joy; while every concupiscible 278 2, 23 | belongs to the passion of "desire" or "concupiscence": ~and 279 2, 23 | passions; viz. love and hatred, desire and aversion, joy ~and sadness. 280 2, 24 | they ~fear to sin, they desire to persevere; they grieve 281 2, 24 | specifically good, such as love, desire and joy: and that those 282 2, 25 | relating to movement - e.g. desire; and something belonging 283 2, 25 | faculty. Thus hope adds to desire a certain effort, and a 284 2, 25 | which is the same passion as desire. But "things are named from 285 2, 25 | Anima ii, 4). Therefore desire takes precedence ~of love.~ 286 2, 25 | But concupiscence or ~desire is a movement towards union 287 2, 25 | coveted or desired. ~Therefore desire precedes love.~Aquin.: SMT 288 2, 25 | the beloved object, ~is desire; and, having and enjoying 289 2, 25 | movement towards good is desire or ~concupiscence; and rest 290 2, 25 | this ~order, love precedes desire, and desire precedes pleasure. 291 2, 25 | love precedes desire, and desire precedes pleasure. But in 292 2, 25 | pleasure intended ~causes desire and love. For pleasure is 293 2, 25 | is not possessed, it is ~desire or concupiscence: and, as 294 2, 25 | pleasure, which follows desire. There is also an ~affective 295 2, 25 | precedes the movement of desire.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[25] A[ 296 2, 25 | from this - that as the desire of good is the ~reason for 297 2, 25 | love and hatred are first; desire and aversion, second; hope ~ 298 2, 25 | that love precedes hatred; desire precedes aversion; ~hope 299 2, 25 | reason ~for approach or desire. Consequently hope, which 300 2, 25 | sqq.) omits ~hope and puts desire in its place.~Aquin.: SMT 301 2, 25 | in love, goes ~forward to desire, and ends in hope; while 302 2, 25 | appetite's common tendency to desire or shun something.~Aquin.: 303 2, 25 | Reply OBJ 1: Augustine puts desire or covetousness in place 304 2, 26 | 1) Love and hatred; (2) Desire and aversion; (3) Pleasure 305 2, 26 | the object ~beloved, is desire; having and enjoying it, 306 2, 26 | spoken of as being fear, joy, desire and sadness, ~not essentially 307 2, 26 | the appetite; for this ~is desire, of which movement love 308 2, 26 | object, and this movement is "desire"; and lastly, there is rest 309 2, 26 | certain things, because we desire ~them: thus "a man is said 310 2, 26 | good: while we are said to desire, ~what we wish for ourselves.~ 311 2, 27 | is that ~which calms the desire; while the notion of the 312 2, 27 | is that which ~calms the desire, by being seen or known. 313 2, 27 | potentiality, as such, has ~the desire for its act; and it takes 314 2, 27 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 2: Further, desire is a passion. But we love 315 2, 27 | we love some because we desire ~to receive something from 316 2, 27 | 2 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: Desire for a thing always presupposes 317 2, 27 | love for that thing. ~But desire of one thing can be the 318 2, 27 | pleasure; and by reason of desire, because hope ~strengthens 319 2, 27 | because hope ~strengthens desire, since we do not desire 320 2, 27 | desire, since we do not desire so intensely that which 321 2, 28 | because love ~moves man to desire and seek the presence of 322 2, 28 | pleasure as being its cause; desire implies the real absence 323 2, 28 | extrinsic cause ~(as when we desire one thing on account of 324 2, 28 | is proper to friends "to desire the same things, and ~to 325 2, 28 | love ~for love, and both desire and do good things for one 326 2, 28 | sadness); and an intense desire to possess the ~beloved, 327 2, 28 | above (A[5]; Q[27], A[4]) desire, sadness and ~pleasure, 328 2, 29 | pertains to hatred; while ~desire for pleasure belongs to 329 2, 29 | desires good, nor can anyone desire ~anything for himself, save 330 2, 29 | All men have a natural desire for knowledge," as stated ~ 331 2, 29 | is said (Job 21:14): "We ~desire not the knowledge of Thy 332 2, 29 | from ~accomplishing one's desire.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[29] A[ 333 2, 30 | The concupiscence [Douay: 'desire'] of wisdom bringeth to 334 2, 30 | 1/1~OBJ 2: Further, the desire for the commandments of 335 2, 30 | that which is good." But desire ~for God's commandments 336 2, 30 | OBJ 2: Properly speaking, desire may be not only in the lower, 337 2, 30 | concupiscence is infinite, men desire an infinite number of things."~ 338 2, 30 | getting food, a man ~may desire food yet again; and so of 339 2, 30 | that desires riches, may desire to be rich, ~not up to a 340 2, 30 | riches; ~whereas those who desire riches, on account of the 341 2, 30 | the necessities of life, ~desire a finite measure of riches, 342 2, 31 | same movement, that of desire, ends in joy and delight. 343 2, 31 | in those things which we desire naturally, when we get them, ~ 344 2, 31 | in those things which we desire as a result of reason. But 345 2, 31 | Para. 2/2~Now whatever we desire naturally, can also be the 346 2, 31 | the object of reasoned ~desire and delight, but not vice 347 2, 31 | while joy corresponds to ~desire, which seems to pertain 348 2, 31 | Civ. Dei xiv, ~6) that "desire and joy are nothing else 349 2, 32 | regarding good, so ~also do desire and love. Therefore hope 350 2, 32 | pleasure, any more than desire or love.~Aquin.: SMT FS 351 2, 32 | manner every object ~of desire is pleasing to the one that 352 2, 32 | one that desires, since desire is chiefly a ~craving for 353 2, 32 | why all animals naturally desire pleasure: because animals 354 2, 32 | melancholic ~has a strong desire for pleasures, in order 355 2, 32 | therefore the greater the desire for the thing loved, ~the 356 2, 32 | indeed the very increase of ~desire brings with it an increase 357 2, 32 | above ~(A[3], ad 3) that desire resulting from hope is a 358 2, 32 | Now ~wonder is a kind of desire for knowledge; a desire 359 2, 32 | desire for knowledge; a desire which comes to man ~when 360 2, 32 | so far as it includes the desire of learning the cause, and 361 2, 32 | proceeds from a greater desire: for greater desire is awakened 362 2, 32 | greater desire: for greater desire is awakened when ~we are 363 2, 32 | from the fact ~that we desire to know something about 364 2, 32 | mind is more ~inclined by desire to act intensely in things 365 2, 33 | pleasure causes thirst or desire for itself?~(3) Whether 366 2, 33 | But ~receiving pertains to desire, which is for something 367 2, 33 | expansion seems to belong to desire rather than to pleasure.~ 368 2, 33 | 2 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: Desire includes a certain expansion 369 2, 33 | since pleasure is the end of desire.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[33] A[ 370 2, 33 | pleasure causes thirst or desire for itself?~Aquin.: SMT 371 2, 33 | pleasure does not cause desire for itself. ~Because all 372 2, 33 | repose of the movement of desire, as stated above ~(Q[23], 373 2, 33 | Therefore the movement of desire ceases when ~pleasure is 374 2, 33 | pleasure does not cause desire.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[33] A[ 375 2, 33 | in a way, contrary to desire, on the part of the object: 376 2, 33 | part of the object: since desire ~regards a good which is 377 2, 33 | pleasure does not cause desire for ~itself.~Aquin.: SMT 378 2, 33 | distaste is incompatible with desire. But pleasure often ~causes 379 2, 33 | Therefore it does not cause desire.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[33] A[ 380 2, 33 | memory. Again thirst, ~or desire, can be taken in two ways; 381 2, 33 | itself cause ~thirst or desire for itself, but only accidentally; 382 2, 33 | provided we take ~thirst or desire as denoting a craving for 383 2, 33 | delight sets up a thirst or desire for perfect knowledge; in ~ 384 2, 33 | other hand, if by thirst or desire we understand the mere ~ 385 2, 33 | pleasures cause thirst or desire for themselves. Because ~ 386 2, 33 | 1 Pt. 1:12) that they ~"desire to look at Him."~Aquin.: 387 2, 33 | tendency to cause ~thirst and desire for itself: when, to wit, 388 2, 33 | rest; ~and the movement of desire, tending to what was not 389 2, 33 | it is imperfect, then the desire, tending to what was not ~ 390 2, 33 | it may be ~the object of desire and pleasure at the same 391 2, 33 | cause distaste in one way, desire in another, as ~stated above.~ 392 2, 34 | is preceded by love and desire. Therefore it is not ~the 393 2, 34 | 1~Reply OBJ 1: Love and desire precede pleasure in the 394 2, 35 | so far as, from a strong desire ~for a certain pleasure, 395 2, 35 | cause of sorrow; whereas the desire for pleasure ~does not arise 396 2, 35 | resists the movement of desire for ~pleasure: since the 397 2, 35 | account of evil. Therefore the desire for pleasure is more eager 398 2, 35 | 1/2 ~I answer that, The desire for pleasure is of itself 399 2, 35 | always partial. Therefore desire for pleasure is ~naturally 400 2, 35 | of the inward thought and desire, not only in men, but also 401 2, 36 | of an evil?~(2) Whether desire is a cause of sorrow?~(3) 402 2, 36 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether desire is a cause of sorrow?~Aquin.: 403 2, 36 | OBJ 1: It would seem that desire is not a cause of pain or 404 2, 36 | stated above (A[1]): whereas ~desire is a movement of the appetite 405 2, 36 | other contrary. ~Therefore desire is not a cause of pain.~ 406 2, 36 | present; whereas the object of desire is something ~future. Therefore 407 2, 36 | something ~future. Therefore desire is not a cause of pain.~ 408 2, 36 | not a cause of pain. ~But desire is pleasant in itself, as 409 2, 36 | Rhet. i, 11). ~Therefore desire is not a cause of pain or 410 2, 36 | necessary to be done, and desire of things hurtful, found 411 2, 36 | cause of error. Therefore desire is a cause of sorrow.~Aquin.: 412 2, 36 | But since concupiscence or desire is the first effect ~of 413 2, 36 | Augustine often speaks of desire or ~concupiscence in the 414 2, 36 | this sense he says that desire is the universal cause of ~ 415 2, 36 | sorrow. Sometimes, however, desire taken in its proper sense, 416 2, 36 | of sorrow. Consequently, desire ~becomes a cause of sorrow, 417 2, 36 | of future ~good which we desire to have.~Aquin.: SMT FS 418 2, 36 | 3 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: Desire gives pleasure, so long 419 2, 36 | presence of an obstacle, desire causes sorrow.~Aquin.: SMT 420 2, 36 | for the same reason we desire the conjunction of good ~ 421 2, 36 | evident how their souls desire ~unity, in ruling and quickening 422 2, 36 | answer that, Forasmuch as the desire or craving for good is reckoned ~ 423 2, 36 | therefore, just as love or desire ~for good is a cause of 424 2, 36 | Hence neither does ~the desire of any kind of unity cause 425 2, 36 | which is due. Wherefore the desire ~for such like separation 426 2, 37 | Further, sorrow causes desire in many cases, as stated 427 2, 37 | in Ethic. ~vii, 14. But desire causes intensity of action. 428 2, 37 | vii, 3) that "anger and ~desire drive some to madness": 429 2, 37 | measure: such are love, joy, ~desire and the like; wherefore 430 2, 40 | Whether hope is the same as desire or cupidity?~(2) Whether 431 2, 40 | Whether hope is the same as desire of cupidity? ~Aquin.: SMT 432 2, 40 | that hope is the same as desire or cupidity. ~Because hope 433 2, 40 | the same as ~cupidity or desire.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[40] A[ 434 2, 40 | the object of cupidity or desire, viz. the ~future good. 435 2, 40 | the same as cupidity or desire.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[40] A[ 436 2, 40 | that hope, in addition to desire, denotes the ~possibility 437 2, 40 | the object of cupidity or desire, and of hope. Therefore 438 2, 40 | differ specifically from desire or cupidity.~Aquin.: SMT 439 2, 40 | irascible power; whereas desire or cupidity ~is in the concupiscible. 440 2, 40 | differs specifically from desire ~or cupidity.~Aquin.: SMT 441 2, 40 | respect, hope differs from desire or ~cupidity, which regards 442 2, 40 | that hope ~differs from desire, as the irascible passions 443 2, 40 | moreover, hope presupposes desire: just ~as all irascible 444 2, 40 | OBJ 1: Augustine mentions desire instead of hope, because 445 2, 40 | nothing: thus implying that desire seems to tend chiefly to ~ 446 2, 40 | possibility to the object ~of desire, but also difficulty: and 447 2, 40 | like hope, presupposes desire; because we neither ~hope 448 2, 40 | of that which we do not desire to have. For this ~reason, 449 2, 40 | which is the object of desire.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[40] A[ 450 2, 40 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 2: Further, desire precedes hope. But desire 451 2, 40 | desire precedes hope. But desire is caused by love, as ~stated 452 2, 40 | hope save for that which we desire and love. But ~in so far 453 2, 41 | is ~neither harassed by desire, nor wounded by sickness" - 454 2, 41 | that fear is "a power of desire": ~and both sorrow and desire 455 2, 41 | desire": ~and both sorrow and desire are in the concupiscible 456 2, 41 | painful." In like manner desire is ascribed by Damascene 457 2, 41 | as hope arises from the desire of good, so fear arises ~ 458 2, 41 | of evil arises from the desire of ~good, as is evident 459 2, 41 | account of its natural ~desire to exist; and such fear 460 2, 41 | not to nature, but to the ~desire of the appetite; and such 461 2, 41 | Q[31], A[7]) that love, ~desire, and pleasure are divisible 462 2, 41 | to be natural, as love, ~desire, and hope; whereas the others 463 2, 41 | because love and hatred, desire and avoidance, imply a certain ~ 464 2, 41 | while we may also speak of desire and hope as ~being even 465 2, 46 | anger is more natural than desire?~(6) Whether anger is more 466 2, 46 | inflicted, ~and unless there be desire and hope of revenge: for, 467 2, 46 | is "the sword-bearer ~of desire," inasmuch, to wit, as it 468 2, 46 | obstacle stands in ~the way of desire. But an obstacle has the 469 2, 46 | craves for ~revenge." But the desire for revenge is a desire 470 2, 46 | desire for revenge is a desire for something good: ~since 471 2, 46 | and such movements are desire, hope, ~pleasure, sorrow, 472 2, 46 | that anger is a kind of "desire." ~But desire is in the 473 2, 46 | a kind of "desire." ~But desire is in the concupiscible 474 2, 46 | is made up of sorrow and ~desire." Both of these are in the 475 2, 46 | Cicero gives the name of desire to any kind of craving for ~ 476 2, 46 | reckons anger as a kind of desire, ~inasmuch as it is a desire 477 2, 46 | desire, ~inasmuch as it is a desire of vengeance. In this sense, 478 2, 46 | In this sense, however, desire ~is common to the irascible 479 2, 46 | be composed of sorrow and desire, not as ~though they were 480 2, 46 | above (A[2]), anger is a desire for vengeance. ~Now vengeance 481 2, 46 | anger is more natural than desire?~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[46] A[ 482 2, 46 | is not more natural than desire. Because ~it is proper to 483 2, 46 | is no more natural than desire, in fact it seems to be 484 2, 46 | requires an act of reason, but desire does not," as stated in ~ 485 2, 46 | Ethic. vii, 6. Therefore desire is more natural than anger.~ 486 2, 46 | craving for vengeance: while desire is a ~craving for those 487 2, 46 | than vengeance. Therefore desire is more natural than ~anger.~ 488 2, 46 | anger is ~more natural than desire."~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[46] A[ 489 2, 46 | the cause of anger and of desire, on the part of the object, ~ 490 2, 46 | part of the object, ~thus desire, especially of pleasures 491 2, 46 | natural; and, in a manner, desire is ~more natural. Because 492 2, 46 | considered as an animal; thus ~desire is more natural than anger; 493 2, 46 | that man is inclined to desire those things which tend 494 2, 46 | more natural to man than desire, in so far ~as anger follows 495 2, 46 | follows reason more than desire does. Wherefore the Philosopher ~ 496 2, 46 | anger is more ~natural than desire; for the reason that anger 497 2, 46 | tendency to anger, more than desire, or any other passion, is ~ 498 2, 46 | from a natural tendency to desire, which tendencies result 499 2, 46 | temperamentally ~disposed to desire, is inflamed with desire: 500 2, 46 | desire, is inflamed with desire: and for this reason the ~


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