Table of Contents | Words: Alphabetical - Frequency - Inverse - Length - Statistics | Help | IntraText Library
Alphabetical    [«  »]
thereto 1
these 264
thessalonians 2
they 486
thickest 1
thieves 1
thine 7
Frequency    [«  »]
641 which
572 but
571 by
486 they
483 we
469 with
460 who
St. Augustine
On Christian Doctrine

IntraText - Concordances

they

    Book, Chapter
1 pref, 0| students of the word, that they may profit not only from 2 pref, 0| objections, yet at least they will not prevail with others ( 3 pref, 0| prevail with others (over whom they might have influence, did 4 pref, 0| might have influence, did they not find them forearmed 5 pref, 0| this work of mine, because they have failed to understand 6 pref, 0| purpose, because, though they understand the rules, yet 7 pref, 0| interpret Scripture by them, they have failed to clear up 8 pref, 0| failed to clear up the point they wish cleared up; and these, 9 pref, 0| cleared up; and these, because they have received no assistance 10 pref, 0| Scripture well, or think they do, and who, because they 11 pref, 0| they do, and who, because they know (or imagine) that they 12 pref, 0| they know (or imagine) that they have attained a certain 13 pref, 0| understanding. It is just as if they were anxious to see the 14 pref, 0| it out with my finger: if they had not sight enough to 15 pref, 0| enough to see even my finger, they would surely have no right 16 pref, 0| for those who, even though they know and understand my directions, 17 pref, 0| obscure passages in Scripture, they may stand for those who, 18 pref, 0| to open men's eyes that they may see either the fact 19 pref, 0| Divine Grace, and boast that they understand and can explain 20 pref, 0| remember that, however justly they may rejoice in God's great 21 pref, 0| was from human teachers they themselves learnt to read. 22 pref, 0| themselves learnt to read. Now, they would hardly think it right 23 pref, 0| hardly think it right that they should for that reason be 24 pref, 0| and if the fact be so, they boast of a real advantage, 25 pref, 0| one of no ordinary kind), they must surely grant that every 26 pref, 0| them direct to God, that they too may learn by the inward 27 pref, 0| speech or writing, what they understand, surely they 28 pref, 0| they understand, surely they cannot blame me if I likewise 29 pref, 0| likewise teach not only what they understand, but also the 30 pref, 0| rules of interpretation they follow. For no one ought 31 1, 1 | have; that is to say, if they use freely and cheerfully 32 1, 1 | freely and cheerfully what they have received, He will add 33 1, 1 | hungry people. But when once they began to distribute them, 34 1, 1 | thousands were satisfied, they filled baskets with the 35 1, 2 | his son; for these, though they are things, are also signs 36 1, 2 | consider about things is what they are in themselves, not what 37 1, 2 | themselves, not what other things they are signs of. ~ 38 1, 5 | God, and at the same time they are all one God; and each 39 1, 5 | complete substance, and yet they are all one substance. The 40 1, 7 | itself, is God of gods: or if they try to get beyond the universe, 41 1, 7 | get beyond the universe, they picture to themselves something 42 1, 7 | beautiful form conceivable; or they represent it in the form 43 1, 7 | form of the human body, if they think that superior to all 44 1, 7 | superior to all others. Or if they think that there is no one 45 1, 7 | equal rank, still these too they conceive as possessed of 46 1, 8 | think of Him as living, they only can form any conception 47 1, 8 | animated by it. Then, when they go on to look into the nature 48 1, 8 | nature of the life itself, if they find it mere nutritive life, 49 1, 8 | such as that of plants, they consider it inferior to 50 1, 8 | and above this, again, they place intelligent life, 51 1, 8 | this is subject to change, they are compelled to place above 52 1, 8 | caught sight of this wisdom, they could never with entire 53 1, 8 | very rule of truth by which they affirm the unchangeable 54 1, 8 | itself unchangeable: and they cannot find such a rule, 55 1, 8 | beyond their own nature; for they find nothing in themselves 56 1, 9 | preference to that which they own to be more excellent 57 1, 14 | And just as surgeons, when they bind up wounds, do it not 58 1, 14 | limbs and wounds to which they are applied: He was born 59 1, 15 | believers animated, when they reflect how great He was 60 1, 15 | great things for them while they were still in unbelief! 61 1, 15 | into the careless, so that they retake themselves to diligent 62 1, 18 | that his sins are remitted, they should not be remitted to 63 1, 23 | their persecutors, although they used it to attain the favour 64 1, 24 | when some people say that they would rather be without 65 1, 24 | without a body altogether, they entirely deceive themselves. 66 1, 24 | and its heaviness, that they hate. And so it is not no 67 1, 24 | and very light body, that they want. But they think a body 68 1, 24 | body, that they want. But they think a body of that kind 69 1, 24 | no body at all, because they think such a thing as that 70 1, 24 | And as to the fact that they seem in some sort to scourge 71 1, 24 | right spirit do it not that they may get rid of their body, 72 1, 24 | of their body, but that they may have it in subjection 73 1, 24 | every needful work. For they strive by a kind of toilsome 74 1, 24 | enjoyment of unworthy objects. They are not destroying themselves; 75 1, 24 | not destroying themselves; they are taking care of their 76 1, 24 | enemy. And in this matter they are led astray by a mistaken 77 1, 24 | mistaken interpretation of what they read: "The flesh lusteth 78 1, 24 | one eye, even supposing they could do so without suffering 79 1, 24 | suffering any pain, and that they had as much sight left in 80 1, 24 | much sight left in one as they formerly had in two, unless 81 1, 25 | some of their limbs that they might obtain other objects 82 1, 25 | obtain other objects which they valued more highly. But 83 1, 29 | to desire, however, that they should all join with us 84 1, 29 | dens of iniquity though they be, if a man is fond of 85 1, 29 | for the sake of him whom they admire in common; and the 86 1, 29 | own existence and the love they bear Him, concerning whom 87 1, 29 | reward, even Himself whom they love? And hence it is that 88 1, 29 | do not fear them, seeing they cannot take away from us 89 1, 29 | rather, because the more they hate us the more are they 90 1, 29 | they hate us the more are they separated from Him whom 91 1, 29 | Him whom we love. For if they would turn to Him, they 92 1, 29 | they would turn to Him, they must of necessity love Him 93 1, 30 | question about angels. For they are happy in the enjoyment 94 1, 33 | with the provision which they have received of God for 95 1, 34 | is, by me men come, to me they come, in me they rest. For 96 1, 34 | to me they come, in me they rest. For when we come to 97 1, 39 | Whether there be prophecies, they shall fail; whether there 98 1, 39 | whether there be tongues, they shall cease; whether there 99 1, 39 | of these instruments (as they may be called), so great 100 1, 39 | holding to what is perfect, they do not seek for what is 101 2, arg | of the heathen, so far as they are true and useful, may 102 2, 1 | attending to anything but what they are in themselves, even 103 2, 1 | themselves, even though they are signs of something else, 104 2, 1 | direction, not to attend to what they are in themselves, but to 105 2, 1 | themselves, but to the fact that they are signs, that is, to what 106 2, 1 | signs, that is, to what they signify. For a sign is a 107 2, 1 | sounds, soldiers know that they are to advance or retreat, 108 2, 2 | purpose of showing, as well as they can, the feelings of their 109 2, 2 | among themselves by which they make known the desires in 110 2, 2 | any purpose, or whether they are really used with the 111 2, 4 | words pass away as soon as they strike upon the air, and 112 2, 5 | in accordance with which they believe these men to have 113 2, 6 | another; and in some places they cannot hit upon even a fair 114 2, 6 | softened down, just as if they had been torn off and masticated 115 2, 6 | not seek at all because they have what they require just 116 2, 6 | all because they have what they require just beside them 117 2, 7 | men see Him just so far as they die to this world; and so 118 2, 7 | this world; and so far as they live to it they see Him 119 2, 7 | so far as they live to it they see Him not. But yet, although 120 2, 8 | belief of the truth, so that they will not take first possession 121 2, 8 | most likely opinion is that they were written by Jesus the 122 2, 8 | the son of Sirach. Still they are to be reckoned among 123 2, 8 | prophetical books, since they have attained recognition 124 2, 10 | either proper or figurative. They are called proper when they 125 2, 10 | They are called proper when they are used to point out the 126 2, 10 | to point out the objects they were designed to point out, 127 2, 11 | Hebrew and Greek, that they may have recourse to the 128 2, 11 | Some of these, although they could have been translated, 129 2, 12 | figuratively of Christians, because they are spiritually born of 130 2, 13 | it in the language which they translate; and since the 131 2, 13 | understanding of the passage, yet they are offensive to those who 132 2, 13 | kind, just in proportion as they are weak; and they are weak 133 2, 13 | proportion as they are weak; and they are weak just in proportion 134 2, 13 | weak just in proportion as they wish to seem learned, not 135 2, 13 | And what the land is that they dwell in, whether it be 136 2, 13 | or bad: and what cities they be that they dwell in. Num. 137 2, 13 | what cities they be that they dwell in. Num. 13:19) And 138 2, 14 | pure Latin than those which they have learnt from Scripture, 139 2, 14 | very great assistance, if they are examined and discussed 140 2, 14 | corrected, at least when they are copies of the same translation. ~ 141 2, 15 | unworthy of confidence assert, they were separated during the 142 2, 15 | anything to it? And even if they conferred together with 143 2, 15 | thus it is possible that they translated in such a way 144 2, 15 | that of those who, though they were seventy in number, 145 2, 17 | most beautiful statues, they should select and purchase 146 2, 17 | in visions, nor because they had presented themselves 147 2, 18 | to learn letters because they say that Mercury discovered 148 2, 18 | discovered them; nor because they have dedicated temples to 149 2, 18 | and avoid men who, "when they knew God, glorified him 150 2, 18 | Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools, and changed 151 2, 19 | the other of things which they have noted, either as transacted 152 2, 20 | superstitious, pertaining as they do either to the worship 153 2, 20 | incantations, or in marks which they call characters, or in hanging 154 2, 20 | manifest; and these remedies they call by the less offensive 155 2, 21 | For these, too, although they may seek with pains for 156 2, 21 | it out, yet in so far as they attempt thence to predict 157 2, 21 | heavens without the names they now bear. But as the men 158 2, 21 | by human folly to honour, they seemed to think that in 159 2, 21 | their names upon the stars they were raising the dead men 160 2, 21 | to heaven. But whatever they may be called by men, still 161 2, 21 | after His own pleasure, and they have a fixed movement, by 162 2, 21 | in these terms: "For if they were able to know so much 163 2, 21 | able to know so much that they could weigh the world, how 164 2, 21 | weigh the world, how did they not more easily find out 165 2, 22 | position of the stars, which they call constellations, at 166 2, 22 | under the same stars, while they do not meet with equal fortune 167 2, 22 | equal fortune either in what they do or what they suffer, 168 2, 22 | in what they do or what they suffer, but often meet with 169 2, 22 | to the same class as if they were leagues and covenants 170 2, 23 | their evil desires. For they are deluded and imposed 171 2, 23 | known, and turn out just as they are foretold; and in the 172 2, 23 | ensnared by these successes, they become more eagerly inquisitive, 173 2, 23 | but it says, "Even if what they tell you should come to 174 2, 23 | because the things which they sacrifice they sacrifice 175 2, 23 | things which they sacrifice they sacrifice to devils and 176 2, 23 | God and our neighbour, but they waste the hearts of wretched 177 2, 23 | committed them to writing, as if they had drawn them by rule. ~ 178 2, 24 | the common language, but they are all full of hurtful 179 2, 24 | For it was not because they had meaning that they were 180 2, 24 | because they had meaning that they were attended to, but it 181 2, 24 | to and marking them that they came to have meaning. And 182 2, 24 | to have meaning. And so they are made different for different 183 2, 24 | the same sort of omens as they see his own conjectures 184 2, 24 | upon them as signs because they were already significant, 185 2, 24 | significant, but on the contrary they are now significant because 186 2, 24 | rites of the augurs; for they, both before they observe 187 2, 24 | augurs; for they, both before they observe the omens and after 188 2, 24 | observe the omens and after they have completed their observations, 189 2, 25 | force among men, because they have agreed among themselves 190 2, 25 | agreed among themselves that they should be in force, are 191 2, 25 | possible be like the things they signify. But because one 192 2, 25 | significance among men, except when they have mutually agreed upon 193 2, 25 | a mistake, especially if they are executed by skilled 194 2, 25 | likenesses recognizes the things they are likenesses of. And this 195 2, 25 | reckoned whatever differences they choose to make in bodily 196 2, 25 | same kind. Now these, if they were not devices of men, 197 2, 26 | intercourse of men, are, so far as they are not matters of luxury 198 2, 26 | in learning them, nor do they involve us in superstition, 199 2, 26 | enervate us by luxury, if they only occupy our minds so 200 2, 26 | important objects to which they ought to be subservient. ~ 201 2, 27 | testimony, or perceive when they are pointed out to us, or 202 2, 28 | those sayings of His, which they are compelled to admire 203 2, 28 | books of Plato because (they urged) it cannot be denied 204 2, 28 | philosophers learnt whatever they said that was good and true 205 2, 31 | but clever men too, when they are not on their guard. 206 2, 31 | false, it follows that since they would be true if the dead 207 2, 32 | observed and noted by them that they may be able to learn and 208 2, 34 | consider propositions as they stand by themselves, and 209 2, 34 | that are true and certain, they themselves, too, necessarily 210 2, 34 | certain. Now some, when they have ascertained the validity 211 2, 34 | for themselves, because they are ignorant of the laws 212 2, 35 | not, though it is possible they might be, true. For example, 213 2, 36 | are not the less true that they can be used for persuading 214 2, 36 | of what is false; but as they can be used to enforce the 215 2, 36 | whether the cause in which they are used be true or false, 216 2, 36 | themselves true just in so far as they are effective in producing 217 2, 36 | are so, than arranged that they should be so. ~ 218 2, 37 | error of supposing that when they have learnt these things 219 2, 37 | have learnt these things they have learnt the true secret 220 2, 37 | to attend to them while they are going through them, 221 2, 37 | them, or to understand when they are told about them. Those, 222 2, 37 | about such directions, as they cannot prove them by making 223 2, 37 | opinions, except perhaps that they put the intellect in better 224 2, 37 | take care, however, that they do not at the same time 225 2, 37 | vanity, that is to say, that they do not give those who have 226 2, 37 | or make them think that they have attained some great 227 2, 38 | that it is not true that they are not the double of any 228 2, 38 | sounds, or of other motions, they have fixed laws which were 229 2, 39 | secure for them the happiness they seek; but soberly and carefully 230 2, 39 | discriminate among them. And if they find any of those which 231 2, 39 | conjectures, especially if they involve entering into fellowship 232 2, 39 | those which, pertaining as they do to the senses, are subject 233 2, 40 | providing them with things which they themselves, were not making 234 2, 40 | to abhor and avoid; but they contain also liberal instruction 235 2, 40 | their gold and silver, which they did not create themselves, 236 2, 40 | useful, if it had suspected they were about to turn them 237 2, 40 | vain worship of idols. But they gave their gold and their 238 2, 40 | to the people of God as they were going out of Egypt, 239 2, 40 | not knowing how the things they gave would be turned to 240 2, 41 | in type and shadow, when they were ordered to mark their 241 2, 42 | comparison with the riches which they afterwards attained at Jerusalem, 242 3, 3 | is applied with success, they will remain doubtful, but 243 3, 3 | time past [praedixi], that they which do such things shall 244 3, 5 | takes figurative words as if they were proper, and does not 245 3, 6 | their minds. And although they paid attention to the signs 246 3, 6 | the signs referred, still they had this conviction rooted 247 3, 6 | themselves to such a bondage they were doing the pleasure 248 3, 6 | clinging to these signs as it they were realities, could not 249 3, 6 | earth. These men, because they had been very near to spiritual 250 3, 6 | offerings and types, though they did not clearly apprehend 251 3, 6 | their spiritual meaning, they had learnt to adore the 252 3, 6 | of the Holy Spirit that they sold all their goods, and 253 3, 6 | of which the old temple they were serving was but the 254 3, 7 | were only signs, yet still they used them in reference to 255 3, 7 | I grant, however, that they who make gods of the works 256 3, 7 | man have sunk lower than they who make gods of the works 257 3, 8 | interpreting the signs to which they were in bondage, set them 258 3, 8 | of the One God: not that they might now fall into bondage 259 3, 8 | useful kind, but rather that they might exercise their minds 260 3, 9 | observances he knows to what they refer, and so reveres them 261 3, 10 | a hold upon their minds, they think that the expression 262 3, 11 | plain expression is used: "They that are Christ's have crucified 263 3, 12 | hidden kernel of meaning they contain is to be picked 264 3, 12 | it does not follow that they are more temperate than 265 3, 12 | without blame, although they did things which could not 266 3, 14 | of such actions, unless they are restrained by authority, 267 3, 14 | restrained by authority, they look upon them as sins, 268 3, 18 | lesson, both that the custom they spurn can be turned to a 269 3, 18 | good use, and that which they embrace can be used to condemnation, 270 3, 18 | God than those who, though they had each of them numerous 271 3, 18 | them together had come, they would have immediately made 272 3, 19 | propagating the race; and what they themselves, who are entangled 273 3, 19 | the case of a single wife, they think utterly impossible 274 3, 19 | good and holy men, because they themselves when they are 275 3, 19 | because they themselves when they are honoured and praised, 276 3, 19 | frequently and the more widely they are blown about on the tongue 277 3, 20 | were neither puffed up when they were honoured by men, nor 278 3, 20 | men, nor cast down when they were despised. And certainly 279 3, 20 | to those great men. For they were both cried up by the 280 3, 20 | not in bondage to lust as they are who refuse to believe 281 3, 20 | For if they had been under the influence 282 3, 20 | influence of any such passion, they could never have restrained 283 3, 20 | towards their sons, by whom they knew that their wives and 284 3, 25 | that are only different. They signify contraries, for 285 3, 25 | contraries, for example, when they are used metaphorically 286 3, 25 | uncertain in what sense they ought to be taken, as for 287 3, 25 | observances, however, which they understand in a carnal manner, 288 3, 25 | according to the place in which they are found. ~ 289 3, 26 | where the sense in which they are used is more manifest 290 3, 26 | gather the sense in which they are to be understood in 291 3, 29 | certainly advise, however, that they be learnt elsewhere, although 292 3, 29 | the very opposite of what they say, as for example, those 293 3, 29 | forthwith to inquire whether they may not be used in this 294 3, 30 | sacred writings; but still they do not explain all the difficult 295 3, 30 | would appear as if, when they were thoroughly known and 296 3, 32 | said to be in Him, although they seem to be in His Church. 297 3, 32 | the blind by a way that they knew not; I will lead them 298 3, 32 | lead them in paths that they have not known; I will make 299 3, 32 | is mixed with the good, "They shall be turned back." Now 300 3, 32 | subject of the sentence. They will not, however, always 301 3, 33 | heresies among you, that they which are approved may be 302 3, 34 | dwelt in their own land, they defiled it by their own 303 3, 34 | them for the blood that they had shed upon the land, 304 3, 34 | for their idols wherewith they had polluted it: and I scattered 305 3, 34 | them among the heathen, and they were dispersed through the 306 3, 34 | fathers," not literally, as if they referred to Israel after 307 3, 36 | scattered over the earth they had all one language in 308 3, 36 | and it was after this that they were scattered over the 309 3, 36 | after the past life which they have renounced? Is not the 310 3, 37 | of those also who, though they really belong to him, are 311 3, 37 | up with the Church, until they depart from this life, or 312 3, 37 | gifts of intellect, or as they have access to more or fewer 313 3, 37 | to be understood just as they are expressed, so in the 314 3, 37 | necessary, to pray that they may understand them. For 315 3, 37 | books on the study of which they are intent, they read, " 316 3, 37 | of which they are intent, they read, "The Lord giveth wisdom: 317 3, 37 | understanding;" and it is from Him they have received their very 318 4, arg | when and for what purposes they are mingled; and that they 319 4, arg | they are mingled; and that they all have the same end in 320 4, 1 | schools, and to warn them that they need not look for any such 321 4, 1 | use, but that whatever use they have is to be learnt elsewhere; 322 4, 3 | the eloquence with which they are written, even though 323 4, 3 | spent in enforcing them, they come to be in some small 324 4, 3 | small measure understood, they prove of no service. For 325 4, 3 | always think of them when they are speaking so as to speak 326 4, 3 | accordance with them, unless they are discussing the rules 327 4, 3 | rules of speaking while they are speaking. For we must 328 4, 3 | eloquence at the time when they were speaking, whether they 329 4, 3 | they were speaking, whether they had ever learnt them, or 330 4, 3 | learnt them, or whether they had never even met with 331 4, 3 | them. For it is because they are eloquent that they exemplify 332 4, 3 | because they are eloquent that they exemplify these rules; it 333 4, 3 | these rules; it is not that they use them in order to be 334 4, 3 | imitating them as far as they can? And what do we find 335 4, 3 | not be learnt by boys, if they have the advantage of growing 336 4, 3 | names of any of the faults, they will, from being accustomed 337 4, 3 | in the speech of any one they listen to, and avoid it; 338 4, 4 | instructed, in order that they may be diligent to do what 339 4, 4 | may be diligent to do what they already know, and to bring 340 4, 4 | harmony with the truths they admit, greater vigour of 341 4, 5 | rhetoric should be taught: for they confess that "though wisdom 342 4, 5 | treat of eloquence, though they were ignorant of the true, 343 4, 5 | read and yet neglect them; they read to remember the words, 344 4, 6 | God. With this eloquence they spoke; no other would have 345 4, 6 | beauties of eloquence which they make their boast, are to 346 4, 6 | eloquence peculiarly their own, they so use this eloquence of 347 4, 6 | ostentatious display of it; and if they had shunned it, they would 348 4, 6 | if they had shunned it, they would have done the former; 349 4, 6 | have done the former; if they had made it prominent, they 350 4, 6 | they had made it prominent, they might have appeared to be 351 4, 6 | that the words in which they are put seem not so much 352 4, 7 | some in Latin gradatio, for they do not care to call it scala ( 353 4, 7 | foolishly), I am bold also. Are they Hebrews? so am I. Are they 354 4, 7 | they Hebrews? so am I. Are they Israelites? so am I. Are 355 4, 7 | Israelites? so am I. Are they the seed of Abraham? so 356 4, 7 | of Abraham? so am I. Are they ministers of Christ? (I 357 4, 7 | answers, three to three: "Are they Hebrews? so am I. Are they 358 4, 7 | they Hebrews? so am I. Are they Israelites? so am I. Are 359 4, 7 | Israelites? so am I. Are they the seed of Abraham? so 360 4, 7 | a clause (membrum): "Are they the ministers of Christ? ( 361 4, 7 | contemptible; not because they do not possess, but because 362 4, 7 | not possess, but because they do not display, the eloquence 363 4, 7 | which the more completely they seem buried under figures 364 4, 7 | to the sound of the viol. They thought that they had instruments 365 4, 7 | viol. They thought that they had instruments of music 366 4, 7 | costliest ointment: and they were not grieved for the 367 4, 7 | men such as these, would they have chosen to express themselves 368 4, 7 | even skill in their art: "they thought that they had instruments 369 4, 7 | art: "they thought that they had instruments of music 370 4, 7 | follows all these: "and they were not grieved for the 371 4, 7 | we hold the words, "and they were not grieved," suspended 372 4, 7 | beauty not to say, "and they were not grieved for the 373 4, 7 | and reduced to system, if they had not first had their 374 4, 7 | orators, is it wonderful that they should be found in the messengers 375 4, 8 | the godless either that they may be converted to piety 376 4, 8 | or other of these reasons they have expressed themselves 377 4, 8 | and wholesome obscurity. They have indeed expressed themselves 378 4, 8 | equal to that with which they are themselves regarded, 379 4, 8 | the same authority; but they ought in all their deliverances 380 4, 8 | understand them, or that if what they say should not be very easily 381 4, 8 | and subtilty of the matter they are trying to explain. ~ 382 4, 9 | style that, if understood, they, so to speak, draw their 383 4, 10 | anxiety about teaching that they will employ a word which 384 4, 10 | assemblies of blood), because they felt that it was important 385 4, 10 | use at all in speaking, if they do not understand us for 386 4, 10 | no such words, or because they do not at the time occur 387 4, 10 | the sake of the pleasure they give, if the attention be 388 4, 10 | but to the way in which they are told. Nay, even when 389 4, 11 | making people like what they disliked, nor in making 390 4, 11 | nor in making them do what they shrank from, but in making 391 4, 11 | it is put, and who, when they have succeeded in their 392 4, 12 | hearers, not telling them what they ought to do, but urging 393 4, 12 | but urging them to do what they already know ought to be 394 4, 12 | If however, they do not yet know this, they 395 4, 12 | they do not yet know this, they must of course be instructed 396 4, 12 | course be instructed before they can be moved. And perhaps 397 4, 12 | when people, knowing what they ought to do, do it not. 398 4, 12 | is their duty to do what they do not know? On the same 399 4, 12 | source of pleasure when they are brought to light and 400 4, 12 | but as it is true that they are false, the speech which 401 4, 13 | who are so fastidious that they do not care for truth unless 402 4, 13 | more than to confess that they are true. When, however, 403 4, 14 | chastened style, do so because they cannot attain the former, 404 4, 16 | not direct men how or what they should teach, since the 405 4, 16 | Titus as to how or what they should teach others. And 406 4, 16 | directions how and what they should teach? Or are we 407 4, 16 | without their aid, though they cannot without His), and 408 4, 16 | cannot without His), and yet they are applied; and if it be 409 4, 18 | giving men advice as to how they ought to conduct secular 410 4, 18 | in letters long or short, they are of great importance. 411 4, 19 | worshipped, or if idols, whether they be demons or any created 412 4, 20 | those writings of which they boast so much. But care 413 4, 20 | that the other does; but if they do not happen to be at hand, 414 4, 20 | suggest the fitting words; they need not be selected by 415 4, 20 | heat of battle, not because they are costly, but because 416 4, 20 | are costly, but because they are arms; and yet the same 417 4, 20 | because I tell you the truth? They zealously affect you, but 418 4, 20 | you, but not well; yea, they would exclude you, that 419 4, 21 | various modes of speech as they are exemplified in the writings 420 4, 21 | Christ, for it is written, 'They drank of that spiritual 421 4, 21 | to the virgins, who, as they are the objects of higher 422 4, 21 | holiness and truth bear it; they bear it who are mindful 423 4, 21 | women, in their fear that they may not prove attractive 424 4, 21 | to proclaim openly that they have incurred their own! 425 4, 23 | certain exuberances (as they may be called) of ornament. 426 4, 24 | worse than civil, war which they called Ceterva (for it was 427 4, 24 | the applause showed that they were instructed and delighted, 428 4, 24 | delighted, but the tears that they were subdued. And when I 429 4, 24 | it was to teach them what they were ignorant of, or to 430 4, 24 | to persuade them of what they thought incredible, not 431 4, 24 | not to make them do what they knew they ought to do but 432 4, 24 | make them do what they knew they ought to do but were unwilling 433 4, 24 | Praise and censure, too, when they are eloquently expressed, 434 4, 24 | an effect on some, that they are not only pleased with 435 4, 24 | or believe a truth which they were previously ignorant 436 4, 25 | persuades them to do what they are aware they ought to 437 4, 25 | to do what they are aware they ought to do, but do not; 438 4, 25 | an object as this last? They may desire it who are vain 439 4, 25 | and give up evil ones, if they are not so hardened as to 440 4, 25 | the vehement style; or if they have already begun a good 441 4, 27 | All therefore whatsoever they bid you observe, that observe 442 4, 27 | ye after their works; for they say and do not;" and therefore 443 4, 27 | profit by others. For though they seek their own objects, 444 4, 27 | seek their own objects, they do not dare to teach their 445 4, 27 | own doctrines, sitting as they do in the high places of 446 4, 27 | Moses's seat." The seat they occupied then, which was 447 4, 27 | say what was good, though they did what was evil. And so 448 4, 27 | did what was evil. And so they followed their own course 449 4, 27 | were prevented by the seat they occupied, which belonged 450 4, 27 | to many by preaching what they themselves do not perform; 451 4, 27 | themselves do not perform; but they would do good to very many 452 4, 27 | good to very many more if they lived as they preach. For 453 4, 27 | many more if they lived as they preach. For there are numbers 454 4, 27 | you bid me do? And thus they cease to listen with submission 455 4, 27 | in despising the preacher they learn to despise the word 456 4, 28 | them before the Lord that they strive not about words to 457 4, 28 | are the more pitiable if they happen to be eloquent in 458 4, 29 | deliver it to the people, they cannot be blamed, supposing 459 4, 29 | his own thought, and yet they have nothing in common with 460 4, 29 | And so God has said that they steal His words who would 461 4, 29 | but are in fact bad, as they follow their own ways. And 462 4, 29 | who say the good things they say. For how can they say 463 4, 29 | things they say. For how can they say in words what they deny 464 4, 29 | can they say in words what they deny in deeds? It is not 465 4, 29 | apostle says of such men: "They profess that they know God, 466 4, 29 | men: "They profess that they know God, but in works they 467 4, 29 | they know God, but in works they deny Him." In one sense, 468 4, 29 | Him." In one sense, then, they do say the things, and in 469 4, 29 | things, and in another sense they do not say them; for both 470 4, 29 | place He says, "Whatsoever they bid you observe, that observe 471 4, 29 | lives, that do ye not; "for they say and do not." And so, 472 4, 29 | do not." And so, though they do not, yet they say. But 473 4, 29 | though they do not, yet they say. But in another place, 474 4, 29 | would appear that even what they say, when they say what 475 4, 29 | even what they say, when they say what is good, it is 476 4, 29 | for in will and in deed they deny what they say. Hence 477 4, 29 | and in deed they deny what they say. Hence it happens that 478 4, 29 | to whom belongs all that they say; and even those who 479 4, 29 | who could not compose what they say make it their own by 480 4, 30 | compose for them ought, before they receive their discourse, 481 4, 30 | are preparing it; and when they have received it, they ought 482 4, 30 | when they have received it, they ought to pray both that 483 4, 30 | ought to pray both that they themselves may deliver it 484 4, 30 | and that those to whom they address it may give ear; 485 4, 30 | discourse has a happy issue, they ought to render thanks to 486 4, 30 | thanks to Him from whom they know such blessings come,


Best viewed with any browser at 800x600 or 768x1024 on Tablet PC
IntraText® (V89) - Some rights reserved by Èulogos SpA - 1996-2007. Content in this page is licensed under a Creative Commons License