Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5.  1.  3| interactions between patients and physicians and a good communication
 2   II,     5.  5.  3|     differs significantly between physicians and patients.~There is also
 3   II,     5.  5.  3|           of health care workers (physicians, nurses, psychologists,
 4   II,     5.  9. FB|    patients and underdiagnosed by physicians. However, it can evolve
 5   II,     5.  9. FB|           explained by the higher physiciansawareness of these conditions,
 6   II,     8.  2.  1|           where GPs (primary care physicians) are able to identify those
 7   II,     9.  3.  1|           the American College of Physicians noted that the one year
 8   II,     9.  3.  1|         occur in older women, and physicians must be alert towards the
 9   II,     9.  3.  1|           the American College of Physicians." Annals of Internal Medicine
10  III,    10.  2.  4|          side-effects of drugs as physicians and policy makers are empowered
11   IV,    11.  1.  3| productivity (e.g. in Italy). For physicians, depending on the policy
12   IV,    11.  1.  5|  voluntary, a large proportion of physicians (about 70%) participate.~ ~
13   IV,    11.  1.  5|   disparities in treatment across physicians as well as control spending (
14   IV,    11.  1.  5|     monitoring, together with the physicians concern that following the
15   IV,    11.  1.  5|        American Academy of Family Physicians, 2006). Finally, as paying
16   IV,    11.  1.  5|       common mistake among family physicians (Dovey et al, 2003), while
17   IV,    11.  1.  6|     physician payment methods for physicians in Europe.~ ~Table 11.3.
18   IV,    11.  1.  6|            Countries~Primary care physicians~Ambulatory care specialists~
19   IV,    11.  1.  6|       Ambulatory care specialists~Physicians in public hospital~Physicians
20   IV,    11.  1.  6|     Physicians in public hospital~Physicians in private hospital~Austria~
21   IV,    11.  1.  6|    payment methods that stimulate physicians to expand the provision
22   IV,    11.  2.  1|    greater supply of primary care physicians, this does not seem to be
23   IV,    11.  2.  1|          the case with specialist physicians (Starfield et al, 2005).~ ~
24   IV,    11.  2.  1|   outpatients include all kind of physicians, i.e. both general practitioners
25   IV,    11.  3.  1|        variation in the supply of physicians per capita across Europe.
26   IV,    11.  3.  1|            The highest density of physicians is seen in Greece, with
27   IV,    11.  3.  1|           Greece, with almost 500 physicians per 100,000 population.
28   IV,    11.  3.  1|           inclusion of unemployed physicians in the Greek calculations,
29   IV,    11.  3.  1|          the exclusion of private physicians in the UK. When physicians
30   IV,    11.  3.  1|        physicians in the UK. When physicians are separated into general
31   IV,    11.  3.  1|       greater range of specialist physicians, again with high density,
32   IV,    11.  3.  1|   declining proportion of general physicians, partly reflecting the increasing
33   IV,    11.  3.  1|          6. Numbers of practising physicians, GPs, specialists, nurses,
34   IV,    11.  3.  1|         year period. The level of physicians relates both to characteristics
35   IV,    11.  3.  1|         or limit to the number of physicians trained in the country -
36   IV,    11.  3.  1|          But the lower numbers of physicians also reflect cost-containment
37   IV,    11.  3.  1|         the number and density of physicians, but also their geographical
38   IV,    11.  3.  1|   inequity in the distribution of physicians, typically in favour of
39   IV,    11.  3.  1|    introduced measures to attract physicians to rural and deprived urban
40   IV,    11.  3.  1|       threshold for the number of physicians contracted by a regional
41   IV,    11.  3.  1|      payment mechanism to attract physicians to underserved areas is
42   IV,    11.  3.  2|           drug. In some countries physicians are mandated or encouraged
43   IV,    11.  3.  2|           much depends on whether physicians are given the appropriate
44   IV,    11.  3.  2|        focusing on incentives for physicians, such as individual, practice
45   IV,    11.  6.  2|       cost sharing for ambulatory physicians and inpatient care is in
46   IV,    11.  6.  5|       commonly reported by family physicians." American Family Physician
47   IV,    11.  6.  5|         TH et al. (2004): "Paying Physicians for High-Quality Care."
48   IV,    11.  6.  5|         behaviour of primary care physicians. Chichester, UK, John Wiley &
49   IV,    12.  1    |      which includes among others, physicians and other health professionals;~ ~
50   IV,    12. 10    |        Statutory Health Insurance Physicians (Kassenärztliche Bundesvereinigung,
51  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|     phycotoxins~physical activity~physicians~phytotoxins~piercing~plasmodium~