Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5.  5.Int|           social roles as primary carers for children and/or other
 2   II,     5.  5.Int|          developed to help Users, Carers and families touched by
 3   II,     5.  5.  2|           with dementia and their carers in the member states of
 4   II,     5.  5.  2|      relative. In some countries, carers are supported in their task
 5   II,     5.  5.  2|          it is likely that family carers will continue to play a
 6   II,     5.  5.  2|           with dementia and their carers (ongoing project due to
 7   II,     5.  6.  5| musculoskeletal conditions, their carers and representatives; and
 8   II,     5. 11.  3|          as for their parents and carers (NICE clinical guideline).~
 9   II,     8.  2.  1|         quality of life of family carers should be taken into account
10   II,     8.  2.  1|         they provide care. Family carers often act as the initial
11   II,     8.  2.  1|     exacerbated by their roles as carers, especially if formal supports
12   II,     9.  3.  1|           social roles as primary carers for children and/or other
13   II,     9.  4.  5|        role. Many older women are carers and may devote their energies
14   II,     9.  5.  3|           live longer than men.~ ~Carers: In the UK, nearly one in
15   II,     9.  5.  3|         2007). (See Figure 9.5.3) Carers can often be penalised financially
16   II,     9.  5.  3|          the private sector to be carers. Women who had worked in
17   II,     9.  5.  3|           likely to become unpaid carers (Rowntree, Foundation, 2006).
18   II,     9.  5.  3|         is calculated that 80% of carers are women (Schneekloth and
19   II,     9.  5.  3|           of duties women and men carers engage in, and in the differential
20   II,     9.  5.  3|     higher levels of poor health. Carers were also relatively disadvantaged
21   II,     9.  5.  4|     inequity. The life quality of carers, lone parents, migrants,
22   II,     9.  5.  6|     Poverty in old age awaits the carers who save the UK £15 billion.
23  III,    10.  2.  1|           patient-SHS victims and carers who would otherwise be in
24   IV,    13.  4    |           recognition of informal carers in social security schemes
25   IV,    13.  5    |        care. Support for informal carers and exploiting new technology