Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5.  1.  1|           pollen, fungal spores, dust mites, pet hair, skin and
 2   II,     5.  8.  7|     workers exposed to inorganic dust~Eur Respir J 23: 402-406.~ ~
 3   II,     5.  9. FB|      already sensitized to house dust mites, pets or cockroaches,
 4   II,     5.  9.  4|         epitope Dep p 1 of house dust mites (MAS study, Multicentric
 5   II,     5.  9.  4|         2005). Exposure to house dust mite or cat allergen is,
 6   II,     5.  9.  4|        12.7%), followed by house dust mite (8.9%), silver birch
 7   II,     5.  9.  4|        allergy triggers, such as dust mites, pet fur, moulds,
 8   II,     5.  9.  4|   include ambient air pollution, dust, the inefficient burning
 9   II,     6.  3.  7|    infected animals, or from the dust of contaminated premises.
10  III,    10.  1    | ground-level ozone~fungal spores~dust mites~pollen~pet hair, skin
11  III,    10.  3.  1|      daughters are adsorbed onto dust particles and can, when
12  III,    10.  3.  2|    measurements in rain, fog and dust. (IWW, 2004)~ ~Platinum
13  III,    10.  3.  2| ground-level ozone~fungal spores~dust mites~pollen~pet hair, skin
14  III,    10.  4.  1|          cleaning or changing of dust filters.~Many acute health
15  III,    10.  5.  1|      products into the home, and dust cleaning may actually make
16  III,    10.  5.  1|        may actually make settled dust volatile again. In addition,
17  III,    10.  5.  1|         pet allergens in settled dust (Daisey et al, 2003; Tranter
18  III,    10.  5.  1|      allergens in settled school dust: a review of findings and
19  III,    10.  5.  1|         in relation to microbial dust exposure in schools in Taiyuan,
20  III,    10.  5.  3|         by exposures to asbestos dust. This occupational disease
21  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|    drug-resistant~drugs~duchenne~dust~dust-mite~dusts~dyalisis~