Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    I,     2.  4    |  improvements in health-conducive behaviours (e.g. less smoking, modest
 2    I,     2. 10.  2|           electrical and magnetic behaviours different from those of
 3   II,     5.  2.  3|     environment exposures, health behaviours, diagnosis and treatment.~
 4   II,     5.  4.  4|       with an impact on lifestyle behaviours.~The emergency is constantly
 5   II,     5.  5.  3|         many people with autistic behaviours have related but distinct
 6   II,     5.  5.  3|         Syndrome exhibit autistic behaviours. These behaviours include:
 7   II,     5.  5.  3|        autistic behaviours. These behaviours include: delay in speech/
 8   II,     5.  5.  3|        also exhibit many autistic behaviours, such as social withdrawal,
 9   II,     5.  5.  3|           of their characteristic behaviours include: loss of speech,
10   II,     5.  5.  3| characterized by several autistic behaviours including: developmental
11   II,     5.  9.  1|      asthmatic patients needs and behaviours is fundamental for developing
12   II,     5. 14.  5|          promoting of oral health behaviours can significantly improve
13   II,     7.  4.  7|         to modify individual risk behaviours;~· Influencing close personal
14   II,     8.  2.  1|       functioning and in adaptive behaviours was pioneered by the American
15   II,     8.  2.  1|  individuals with information and behaviours that will lead to more active,
16   II,     9        |      combined unhealthy lifestyle behaviours of smoking, having a low-quality
17   II,     9.  2.  1|           the health-compromising behaviours emerge during childhood.~ ~
18   II,     9.  2.  2|         to medical conditions and behaviours which are exacerbated by
19   II,     9.  2.  3| nutritional and physical exercise behaviours. This in turn is influenced
20   II,     9.  2.  3|          unhealthy weight control behaviours and infrequent shared family
21   II,     9.  2.  3|         in extreme weight control behaviours, compared with 8.8% of girls
22   II,     9.  2.  5|           to address risky sexual behaviours among young people; and
23   II,     9.  3.  1|        and oral hygiene self-care behaviours, such as brushing and flossing;
24   II,     9.  3.  3|        and sexual contact. Sexual behaviours are expressed in a variety
25   II,     9.  3.  3|    prevalence of high-risk sexual behaviours such as occasional sex with
26   II,     9.  3.  3|          increase in risky sexual behaviours may be a consequence of
27   II,     9.  3.  3|          and an increase in risky behaviours.~ ~Sexual orientation~ ~
28   II,     9.  3.  3|       higher probability of risky behaviours in adult life (Signorelli
29   II,     9.  3.  3|           Obviously, risky sexual behaviours may be very dangerous for
30   II,     9.  3.  3|      intention to adopt safer sex behaviours, and to delay the onset
31   II,     9.  3.  3|          the public perception of behaviours. However, sexual habits
32   II,     9.  3.  3|        the modification of sexual behaviours to improve sexual health
33   II,     9.  3.  3|         in relation to other risk behaviours (especially drug and alcohol
34   II,     9.  3.  3|       necessary to promote sexual behaviours that are likely to protect
35   II,     9.  3.  3|           practices, and HIV risk behaviours. Lancet 358:1835-42.~Kangas
36   II,     9.  3.  3|   HIVeducation programs on sexual behaviours of youth in developing and
37   II,     9.  3.  3| encouraging sexual lifestyles and behaviours intended to prevent cervical
38   II,     9.  3.  3|        use and risk-taking sexual behaviours in a large behavioural study.
39   II,     9.  4.  4|      combined unhealthy lifestyle behaviours of smoking, having a low-quality
40   II,     9.  5.  3|   adversely influence health risk behaviours.~ ~Figure 9.5.1. Percentage
41   II,     9.  5.  3|        also be more prone to risk behaviours, e.g. as they are perceived
42   II,     9.  5.  3|       pressure to indulge in risk behaviours. Being younger, they may
43   II,     9.  5.  3|         associated to health risk behaviours: the more advanced the smoking
44   II,     9.  5.  4|       2006; Doyal, 1998). Abusive behaviours such as sexual violence,
45   II,     9.  5.  6|           quit smoking. Addictive Behaviours; 15: 235-245~ ~Brodin J,
46  III,    10.  1    |              Determinants of risk behaviours are complex and interwoven
47  III,    10.  1.  1|           the described component behaviours and influences. Figure 10.
48  III,    10.  1.  1|           and an increase in risk behaviours.~ ~
49  III,    10.  2.  1|    drinking & driving and problem behaviours such as aggression and violence,
50  III,    10.  2.  1|       problems; or different risk behaviours (e.g. drugged driving).
51  III,    10.  2.  1|           drugged driving). These behaviours may cause fatal accidents
52  III,    10.  2.  1|           already mentioned, risk behaviours among drug users, long-term
53  III,    10.  2.  1|     intermediate, modifiable risk behaviours, i.e. oral hygiene practices,
54  III,    10.  2.  1|         alcohol consumption. Such behaviours may not only affect oral
55  III,    10.  2.  1|       conditions, to a variety of behaviours related to oral hygiene
56  III,    10.  2.  1|  Bourgeois & Llodra, In press).~ ~Behaviours and Oral Hygiene Data~ ~
57  III,    10.  2.  1|          health. These individual behaviours are associated to an increased
58  III,    10.  2.  1|           reported tooth brushing behaviours and by the use of a range
59  III,    10.  2.  1|         monitoring health-related behaviours including physical activity
60  III,    10.  6.  2|  improvements in health-conducive behaviours (e.g. less smoking, modest
61  III,    10.  6.  3|           6.3. Violence and other behaviours against society~ ~ ~
62  III,    10.  6.  3|         to modify individual risk behaviours, including the use of alcohol;~·
63   IV,    11.  1.  5|     effects of interventions onto behaviours other than those incentivized (
64   IV,    12.  1    |      adopt healthy lifestyles and behaviours.~Health monitoring~The aim
65   IV,    12.  2    |         drink-driving and problem behaviours such as aggression and violence,
66   IV,    12.  5    |         biological factors~Health behaviours~Living and working conditions~
67   IV,    12. 10    |        empowerment~Health-related behaviours~ high~The Danish Health
68   IV,    12. 10    |        empowerment~Health-related behaviours ~Smoking and tobacco snuff
69   IV,    12. 10    |        empowerment~Health-related behaviours~ ~ ~ ~ ~Smoking and tobacco
70   IV,    12. 10    |     survey covers general health, behaviours relating to health (e.g.
71   IV,    12. 10    |        empowerment~Health-related behaviours~ ~ ~ ~Smoking and tobacco
72   IV,    12. 10    |        empowerment~Health-related behaviours~ ~ ~ ~Smoking and tobacco
73   IV,    12. 10    |        empowerment~Health-related behaviours~ ~ www.sva.gov.lv~ ~Smoking
74   IV,    12. 10    |        empowerment~Health-related behaviours~ ~ ~ The preventable nature
75   IV,    12. 10    |        empowerment~Health-related behaviours~ ~ ~ ~Smoking and tobacco
76   IV,    12. 10    |        priority.~ ~Health-related behaviours~ ~Determinants~ ~Indicators~
77   IV,    12. 10    |      living conditions and health behaviours – and arenas as a basis
78  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|   barriers~bathing~beds~behaviour~behaviours~Belgium~benzene~benzo(a)pyrene~